Husserl and Frege

Husserl and Frege

Husserl and Frege

Husserl and Frege

Excerpt

This essay is partly historical and partly philosophical in its orientation. Chapters I and 2 are more historical, chapters 3 and 4 are more philosophical. None is merely one or the other. Although my research on this theme began with the purpose of reconstructing a more accurate picture of the historical situation than was then available, in the present essay I have also tried to throw some light on the issues and problems with which the two philosophers, Husserl and Frege, were concerned. Since two major components of contemporary philosophy—phenomenology and analytic philosophy—are usually traced back to these two men, it is hoped that this essay will facilitate an understanding between those two components. In my view, the differences between them have been exaggerated. This study, I hope, will show that phenomenology and analytic philosophy started with common problems and concerns, and that there are distinct conceptual routes leading from one to the other. It also aims at suggesting how the philosophical insights derived from both can be fruitfully integrated to yield a rich theory of meaning and mental life.

In chapter I, I make use of an earlier paper from the year 1973. Parts of chapter 3 were read at a Summer Institute on Phenomenology in Berkeley, California, during the summer of 1980. Large parts of the manuscript were discussed in a weekly study group that met in Norman, Oklahoma, during the fall semester of 1980. Parts of it were also presented in Calcutta during the summer of 1981. To all those who participated in the discussions, in Berkeley, Norman, and Calcutta, I am grateful: especially to Hubert Dreyfus and Dagfinn Føllesdal; but also to John Biro, Frank Kirkland, Charlie Brown, and Katharine Mulford. Ms. Claire Hill made available to me her Paris thesis on Husserl and Frege, and thereby put me under obligation: her thesis succeeded in drawing attention to many overlooked aspects of the subject matter. Many friends have encouraged me to write this book: of these, I must specially mention Jim Edie and Elizabeth Stroker. I also thank Dr.Robert W. Shahan, editor of the Southwestern Journal of Philosophy, for permission to reprint theFrege-Husserl correspondence as an appendix to this book. It originally appeared in Southwestern journal of Philosophy, V, 1974.

Aron Gurwitsch expressed considerable interest in my early results. This book is dedicated to his memory.

J. N. Mohanty . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.