The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States

The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States

The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States

The End of Liberalism: The Second Republic of the United States

Excerpt

I wrote this book in the 1960s with the conviction that the ideologies and policies at that time were threatening to produce a deep and permanent change in the American constitution. The Democrats, guided by a new public philosophy—interest-group liberalism—had sought to build a modern state upon good intentions and the support of organized privilege. Such a structure, they felt, could give the state the legitimacy of a broadly representative popular base, and at the same time could provide that state with sufficient independence to insure that it could intervene justly into private affairs.

Fundamental changes in policies and institutions could readily be observed and have been widely accepted as inevitable or good or both. This book was part of a small minority which treated these changes as part of a national crisis of public authority. The First Edition was subtitled accordingly. The view of the Second Edition is that we had our crisis and did not survive it. These changes turned out to be a series of adjustments our political system was making to a still more fundamental change of government and of the basis of rule. Through these adjustments we had actually remade ourselves, politically speaking, to such an extent that I have called the results the Second Republic. And, although this Second Republic is operating under an unwritten constitution, the cumulative changes and adjustments of the past two decades can be pieced together into a sketch of a constitution:

PREAMBLE. There ought to be a national presence in every aspect of the lives of American citizens. National power is no longer a necessary evil; it is a positive virtue.

Article I. It is the primary purpose of this national government to provide domestic tranquility by reducing risk. This risk may be physical or it may be fiscal. In order to fulfill this sacred obligation, the national government shall be deemed to have sufficient power to eliminate threats from the environment through regulation, and to eliminate threats from economic uncertainty through insurance.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.