The Maritimes and Canada before Confederation

The Maritimes and Canada before Confederation

The Maritimes and Canada before Confederation

The Maritimes and Canada before Confederation

Excerpt

This study has been long in the making. A statement of its purpose and something of its history is in the introductory chapter. At one time it threatened to broaden out into a general account of British North America prior to Confederation, and to assume alarming proportions. But candid friends have helped to keep the author to his prescribed task, and the book within reasonable bounds. If at times something which had been ostentatiously discarded has later surreptitiously found its way back into the text the writer can but plead the frailty of human nature. It is with real regret that some of the more colorful details of the Charlottetown and Quebec Conferences have had to be omitted. By concentrating, however, on the struggle between an incipient nationalism and a rugged particularism the author believes that the essential motivation of those epochal meetings can be the more clearly shown.

It is not possible here to enumerate all those who through more than a decade have contributed by suggestion or criticism to the author's ultimate conclusions. His gratitude to these unnamed scholars is none the less sincere. There have been several, however, who by the constancy of their interest and the nature of their help must have specific mention. In the first place Professor Robert Livingston Schuyler of Columbia University has given unsparingly of his time and mature judgment during the whole process of the investigation. Professor J. Bartlet Brebner of the same university has read the first half of the manuscript and made detailed and valuable criticisms. Doctor James T. Shotwell of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace has given freely of his mature editorial experience. Professor Reginald G. Trotter of Queen's University has read the manuscript throughout and given many suggestions. Without his detailed knowledge of the federal movement in British North America the writer might have fallen into many a gaucherie or worse, although he has no desire to disown any ineptitudes that . . .

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