Black and White Racial Identity: Theory, Research, and Practice

Black and White Racial Identity: Theory, Research, and Practice

Black and White Racial Identity: Theory, Research, and Practice

Black and White Racial Identity: Theory, Research, and Practice

Synopsis

This book presents the major theories of black and white racial identity. Moreover, theoretical perspectives that were originally developed to describe social fomentation have been updated and expanded to explain the role of racial identity in counseling dyads, social relationships, and groups. Measures for assessing racial identity are described. Original research addresses the relationship of racial identity to other personality characteristics such as value orientations, decision-making styles and counseling process variables such as satisfaction, counselor strategies, and client reactions.

Excerpt

As psychology in the United States moves toward celebrating its centennial, it seems appropriate to note the relative absence of models designed specifically for the purpose of addressing racial/ethnic development by which to guide the study of behavior. As a substitute for such models, psychologists have deluded themselves into believing that by locating a person in one sociopolitical racial category or another they can indeed predict that person's behavior. While such a belief system might be comforting to its adherents, its result has been a lacuna in the field where issues of race/ethnicity are concerned. Consequently, practitioners and researchers frequently find themselves guessing about how such matters should be managed.

My purposes in writing this book are threefold: (a) to demonstrate that race can be studied from a psychological perspective; (b) to gather in one place much of the relevant literature that has remained scattered in nontraditional social science and behavioral literature for many years; and (c) to inspire others not only to begin to examine the utility of racial identity models for understanding the behavior of Blacks and Whites, but also to begin to consider the usefulness of racially/culturally explicit models for guiding research and practice.

In producing this book, I have received a great deal of encouragement from practitioners and graduate students around the country. Graduate students especially have invested considerable amounts of their own financial and emotional resources, often without the support of their academic communities. Some of their contributions are reflected in the . . .

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