Civil-Military Relations: Building Democracy and Regional Security in Latin America, Southern Asia, and Central Europe

Civil-Military Relations: Building Democracy and Regional Security in Latin America, Southern Asia, and Central Europe

Civil-Military Relations: Building Democracy and Regional Security in Latin America, Southern Asia, and Central Europe

Civil-Military Relations: Building Democracy and Regional Security in Latin America, Southern Asia, and Central Europe

Synopsis

What is the impact of civil-military relations on the consolidation of democracy & the promotion of military & economic cooperation at the regional level? This volume is the first to provide a wealth of comparative experiences which demonstrates that a focus on civilian domination distorts the complexity of the civil-military relationship & does not appreciate the multiple paths to democracy & peace. Focusing on political values & institutional rules for political participation, David Mares has brought together an international cast in an accessible & valuable book for policymakers, academics, & general readers.

Excerpt

J. Soedjati Djiwandono

The civil-military relationship in Indonesia is best characterized by the concept of Dwifungsi, or "the dual function," of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Indonesia (ABRI). the armed forces are not merely a state apparatus for national defense and security; they constitute a sociopolitical force that interacts with civil society. This chapter explores the development and evolution of the doctrine of Dwifungsi and its implications for democracy in Indonesia. in an era when countries from all regions of the world are democratizing, this chapter questions the conventional wisdom regarding the relationship between particular configurations of civilmilitary relations and democracy. Is the consolidation of democracy contingent on cvilian dominance in civil-military relations, to use David Mares's terminology, or can it proceed when the military plays an active political role in politics? Specifically, is ABRI's dual function antithetical to Indonesian democracy or not?

This chapter's first section reviews the historical development of the Indonesian polity, from the postindependence experiment with parliamentary democracy through the establishment of the New Order under President Soeharto. the second section discusses the genesis of ABRI's dual-function doctrine, as well as criticisms of the concept. the final section discusses ABRI's dual function and its implications for Indonesian democracy.

In search of indonesian democracy

In its relatively brief history, Indonesia has experienced numerous changes in its system of government and in its approach to democracy. in the initial months following the country's proclamation of independence on August 17, 1945, Indonesia had a presidential system of government, which was subsequently transformed . . .

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