Statistical Thinking: A Structural Approach

Statistical Thinking: A Structural Approach

Statistical Thinking: A Structural Approach

Statistical Thinking: A Structural Approach

Excerpt

This book is not intended to be the main text of a statistics course. In such a course it should be assigned before work on the main text begins. Used in that way, it could be immensely helpful in breaking the psychological barrier that stands between many students and statistics--especially if statistics is a required course for those students. The most frequent function of the book, however, will probably be as basic reading in the statistics or measurement sections of courses that have broader content domains--courses in the behavioral sciences or in professional curricula (business, education, social work, and so forth) that are related to the social sciences. It can also be used in any course that is concerned primarily with measurement (for example, Educational Tests and Measurements) and in which the instructor does not assume a prior acquaintance with statistics. Varying numbers of chapters may be used to fulfill those various functions, provided only that the chapters assigned are consecutive and begin with Chapter One, Introduction.

It is a book for beginners. Beginners, it seems to me, have special problems. I have elsewhere (The Origins of Intellect, W. H. Freeman and Company, 1969, p. 130) criticized Piaget for what I called his "recapitulation theory" of school learning. I suggested there that it would be extremely inefficient to require a high school physics student to "begin his study of mechanics, for example, at the sensorimotor level, continue through the preoperational and concrete operational levels, and only then be ready to deal with the material on a formal level. . . ."

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