The Acts of William I, King of Scots, 1165-1214

The Acts of William I, King of Scots, 1165-1214

The Acts of William I, King of Scots, 1165-1214

The Acts of William I, King of Scots, 1165-1214

Excerpt

As originally planned, this volume was to have been edited jointly by Mr Scott and myself. Accordingly, we set about the preliminary task of listing, identifying and locating texts, dividing our responsibility chronologically at 1189. We had progressed far enough by 1958 to produce a Handlist of the acts, published by the Regesta editorial committee in cyclostyled typescript. As we had hoped and intended that it should, SYSTEMation of the Handlist prompted a number of knowledgeable and interested scholars to provide us with information about acts we had overlooked, suggest more precise dating, and correct many of our mistakes. Unfortunately, pressure of work forced Mr Scott in 1965 to give up his position as joint editor. He has, however, continued to take an active interest in the progress of the volume. Besides providing many notes on individual charters, witnesses etc., he has been largely responsible for establishing the chronology of the acts from c.1190 to 1214 and for compiling the index of personal names. Moreover, it was owing to his initiative that the important information from Dutch sources relating to Florence of Holland could be incorporated in the introduction and critical apparatus. A special interest in the work from its earliest stages was taken by the late James A. Wright, of Tayport, whose death in 1966 deprived Scottish medieval studies of a scholar whose learning was as profound as it was unassuming. Among many notes and communications sent to me by Mr Wright, mention must be made of an invaluable list of royal clerks and chaplains prepared in 1962. To these two scholars I owe a very special debt of gratitude.

The fact that the whole work of editing has been carried out with the support of the Regesta Committee has immensely lightened the editor's labours. The location of texts in private or out-of-the-way archives, the visiting of these archives for description and measurement of documents and the all-important building up of a collection of photographs of originals and other sources was undertaken by the Committee as a whole. While acknowledging the value of this collective support, I am none the less happy to thank the other individual members of the Committee, namely Dr Grant Simpson, Dr Athol Murray, Professor A. A. M. Duncan and Mr Bruce Webster, for the help they have unstintingly afforded over a long period and in a variety of ways. I wish also to record my sincerest gratitude to a number of other scholars: to Mr and Mrs R. W. Munro, who by their unfailing hospitality no less than by their wide-ranging knowledge of Scottish historical matters made many of my numerous visits to the libraries and archives in Edinburgh a source both of pleasure and enlightenment; and, for all their ready assistance and co-operation, to Mrs Marjorie Anderson, Mr B. W. Beckingsale, Mrs Daphne Brooke, Mr . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.