Washington, the National Capital

Washington, the National Capital

Washington, the National Capital

Washington, the National Capital

Excerpt

Several years ago the writer was persuaded by the public-school authorities of Washington to undertake the writing of a history of the development of the National Capital. It was said that, while civics was taught in the classroom, there was no textbook suitable for reference, and that it was necessary to make use of prints and clippings. About the same time a similar request from a Cornell University professor expressed the need of a history of the plan of the National Capital for use in teaching a course in the history of landscape architecture in the College of Architecture at that university.

However, the writing of the book was held in abeyance until the great public- buildings program which is now under way had taken such definite form that the history of the National Capital could be written with an assurance that the plan would actually be carried out. The $400,000,000 which Congress has authorized during the past four years for the development of the District of Columbia is evidence that the program as now outlined will be completed, and another decade will witness the transformation of Washington into the greatest and most beautiful National Capital in the world.

The writer wishes to express his grateful appreciation to Senator Simeon D. Fess, Chairman of the Joint Committee on the Library, for his sympathetic understanding of the aims to be accomplished and his public spiritedness in initiating the legislation which authorized the publication of this volume, and to Senator George H. Moses, Chairman of the Joint Committee on Printing, for his cordial and courteous cooperation in an endeavor to produce a volume of such excellence as to be in keeping with the comprehensive subject matter contained therein. Acknowledgment is also made to the officials of the executive departments, independent bureaus, and other establishments in the Government service; to various institutions in Washington for their cooperation; and to the members of the National Commission of Fine Arts, with whom the writer has been connected for the past 12 years, and whose interest in promoting the fine arts of this country has been a constant inspiration in the preparation of this book.

H. P. CAEMMERER.

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