Minnesota Mechanical Ability Tests: The Report of a Research Investigation Subsidized by the Committee on Human Migrations of the National Research Council and Conducted in the Department of Psychology of the University of Minnesota

Minnesota Mechanical Ability Tests: The Report of a Research Investigation Subsidized by the Committee on Human Migrations of the National Research Council and Conducted in the Department of Psychology of the University of Minnesota

Minnesota Mechanical Ability Tests: The Report of a Research Investigation Subsidized by the Committee on Human Migrations of the National Research Council and Conducted in the Department of Psychology of the University of Minnesota

Minnesota Mechanical Ability Tests: The Report of a Research Investigation Subsidized by the Committee on Human Migrations of the National Research Council and Conducted in the Department of Psychology of the University of Minnesota

Excerpt

It is difficult for me to write calmly and objectively of this report, so stirred am I by its contribution of fact, method, and insight, and its promise of developments which should significantly improve educational, vocational, and industrial procedures.

The University of Minnesota study of mechanical abilities originated in a program of research which was formulated and promoted by a Committee of the National Research Council whose primary tasks and objectives are thus presented in one of its reports:

The Committee on Scientific Problems of Human Migration was appointed in October, 1922, by the National Research Council on recommendation of its Division of Anthropology and Psychology (1) carefully to consider, from the point of view of natural science, the complex migrational situation resulting from the World War and from the virtual elimination of space as a barrier to movements of man and to race intermixture; (2) to prepare a research program which might reasonably be expected to yield ultimately such reliable information concerning physical, mental and social characteristics, relations and values of ethnic groups (races or peoples) as is necessary for the understanding and wise regulation of mass-movements of mankind; and (3) to initiate, organize, support, coordinate, or otherwise further in accordance with the best judgment of the group, important investigations.

Important modification of our national immigration policy is imminent. Prejudices arising from racial friction, dislike or hatred, are increasingly manifest and threaten to obscure the important issues. Knowledge of human traits and potentialities—indvidual, occupational, ethnic—is tragically inadequate. Wisdom dictates that every effort be made to secure the information which is requisite to intelligent, farsighted, and wise action on practical matters. This needed information and the methods necessary to attain it are fundamental to the safe development of social biology.

As seen by those fresh from use of methods of mental and vocational measurement in the military emergency, the great . . .

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