Dictionary of National Biography: [Fourth Supplement] 1922-1930

Dictionary of National Biography: [Fourth Supplement] 1922-1930

Dictionary of National Biography: [Fourth Supplement] 1922-1930

Dictionary of National Biography: [Fourth Supplement] 1922-1930

Excerpt

This volume contains the biographies of notable persons who died in the nine years 1922-1930. The number of biographies included is greater than in the preceding volume, which covered ten years, and a somewhat ampler treatment of individual lives has been afforded. If the present rate of selection is continued throughout the rest of the century, the result will be to add approximately 7,000 lives to the Main Work and its Supplement as completed in 1901. To add an appreciably larger number would be out of keeping with the scale and historical perspective of the main Dictionary, the aim of which has been to include the biographies of those persons, and those only, whose activities, ideas, writings, or discoveries are deemed to have made a definite contribution to the annals of their generation, and whose careers are therefore likely to be of consequence to present and future historical inquirers.

The fact that the Dictionary now deals with the lives of contemporaries is not without effect upon the character of the biographical notices. In the first place, ample material both published and private is usually available; contributors have less difficulty, therefore, in procuring information than in selecting what appears to be significant. Secondly, almost all the contributors have been in a position to furnish, where thought desirable, personal appreciations of the subjects of the memoirs. Although the most dispassionate judgement seldom turns out to be entirely flawless, yet it is hoped that such estimates as are here supplied may prove useful to future biographers and historians, in helping them to dispel theory or conjecture which is not founded upon the evidence of contemporaries.

The biographies recorded in this volume cover a period of more than a hundred years. Three of them begin as far back as the reign of George IV: the late Professor G. D. Liveing (who died as the result of a street accident at the age of ninety-seven) was born in 1827; Sir Harry Poland in 1829, and Admiral John Moresby, who charted the coasts of New Guinea, in March . . .

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