Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Spirit: Addresses at the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, 1927-1928

Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Spirit: Addresses at the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, 1927-1928

Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Spirit: Addresses at the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, 1927-1928

Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Spirit: Addresses at the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, 1927-1928

Excerpt

When we enter a city which we have not seen before, our minds are filled with the things which greet the eye. The towering buildings, the thoroughfares extending their fascinating perspectives in every direction, the great industrial structures, the public improvements, the schools and universities, the beautiful parks, the residential districts, the churches pointing their slender spires into the sky--all of these things beat in upon the imagination and fill our thought.

After we have been in such a city for a few days we begin to see its more intimate side. We may visit its libraries and art exhibitions. We may seek out its points of historical interest and we will form an impression of the character of the place from the people who throng the streets.

If we read books of travel or listen to travelers' tales, we shall find that outside of personal adventures the things mentioned above have absorbed their interest and the stories they have to tell are an endeavor to convey the impressions which they have received in these respects.

It is a singular thing in a way, and yet quite natural, that the casual traveler does not often think of the men who have accomplished these results. The builders are hidden by the things which they have built. The architect who designed one of the most wonderful temples of Greece caused his name to be carved secretly into the stones and filled the crevasses with plaster, which, in the course of years, fell out, and in this way his name was perpetuated. This temple was one of the wonders of the world, and yet the name of the architect would never have been thought of if he had not resorted to this device.

And yet the real essential thing about any great city is the men who have built it. Without the genius, the broad vision, the foresight, the energy and the practical capacity of such men, no city has ever been built.

The site of Pittsburgh was bountifully endowed by nature with ad-

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