Mortality Rates 1910-1920 with Population of the Federal Censuses of 1910 and 1920 and Intercensal Estimates of Population

Mortality Rates 1910-1920 with Population of the Federal Censuses of 1910 and 1920 and Intercensal Estimates of Population

Mortality Rates 1910-1920 with Population of the Federal Censuses of 1910 and 1920 and Intercensal Estimates of Population

Mortality Rates 1910-1920 with Population of the Federal Censuses of 1910 and 1920 and Intercensal Estimates of Population

Excerpt

Crude mortality rates, based on estimated midyear populations, from all causes and certain principal causes of death in the death registration area and its main subdivisions are contained in the annual reports on Mortality Statistics. These crude rates serve at the time as rough indexes of conditions, but after each census enumeration revised rates should be computed on new intercensal estimates of population. Such revised rates serve as much more accurate measures of conditions in the preceding decade.

For careful analysis of mortality conditions, however, something finer than crude rates is demanded, and with the census enumeration of populations by age, sex, color and race these finer rates, ordinarily known as specific rates, become possible.

Following the 1910 enumeration of the population many revised and some specific rates were published in the annual mortality statistics. Following the 1920 census of population, owing to the large number of states in the registration area and to the great interest manifested in all statistics which relate to the health and welfare of our people, it was decided to publish in a special volume for ready reference, similar revised rates and specific rates. To make the mortality data of still greater value for comparison, many adjusted rates have been included, based on the standard million population of England and Wales in 1901. These adjusted rates, sometimes called standardized rates, smooth out the differences in rates due to differences in the age and sex distribution of the population and so permit more accurate comparisons of mortality conditions in different parts of our own country and in foreign countries, and among the different race stocks. It is well known that still further adjustments of death rates will be necessary before mortality rates will be absolutely true measures of health conditions—as adjustments for differences in occupations and for differences in the number of deaths of nonresidents—but it is hoped that the rates here published will be of real value and that the finer adjustments needed for some investigations will be facilitated by the figures here presented and by the data on nonresidents already published in Mortality Statistics.

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