Prisons and the Problem of Order

Prisons and the Problem of Order

Prisons and the Problem of Order

Prisons and the Problem of Order

Synopsis

The administration of prison regimes in modern Britain has remained a subject of intense debate and controversy for a number of years; in this book, based upon pioneering empirical research, three leading authorities examine the character of social life within two maximum-security prisons. By systematic comparison of the two prisons the authors compare the institutional structures and strategies they deploy for control of inmates. The material is set within the framework of a broader, social theory context. Original, scholarly, and carefully argued, this study will be of central interest to all those with an interest in prisons and their control mechanisms.

Excerpt

Clarendon Studies in Criminology, the successor to Cambridge Studies in Criminology, which was founded by Leon Radzinowicz and J.W.C. Turner more than fifty years ago, aims to provide a forum for outstanding work in criminology, criminal justice, penology and the wider field of deviant behaviour. It is edited under the auspices of three criminological centres: the Cambridge Institute of Criminology, the Mannheim Centre for Criminology and Criminal Justice at the London School of Economics, and the Oxford Centre for Criminological Research.

Richard Sparks, Tony Bottoms and Will Hay's Prisons and the Problem of Order will undoubtedly be widely read for the significant contribution it makes to the understanding of how order is created, maintained, and sometimes fractured in maximum security prisons. It adds an important dimension to the contribution that the Clarendon Series has already made to the study of prison issues: through Jon Vagg's comparative analysis of accountability in European prison systems; Roy King and Kathleen McDermott's anatomy of prison conditions; Elaine Genders and Elaine Player's evaluation of Grendon's therapeutic regime; and Paul Rock's account of the attempt to transform the women's prison at Holloway.

The analysis rests upon a comparative study of two dispersal prisons, Albany and Long Lartin, carried out by the Cambridge Institute towards the end of the 1980's. Although these prisons have changed in several ways since then (Albany having left the dispersal system altogether), as have many aspects of prison policy and practice, the authors draw upon the wealth of data they collected, from interviews with both staff and inmates and from thousands of hours of patient observation, to explore and illustrate some of the abiding problems of creating an ordered environment amongst men in long-term captivity. Their comparison of prisons with different reputations, disciplinary profiles, histories of conflict, and styles of approach to handling disorder, provides the key to an understanding of prisons as complex institutions in which different . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.