Woman as Artist: Papers in Honour of Marsha Hanen

Woman as Artist: Papers in Honour of Marsha Hanen

Woman as Artist: Papers in Honour of Marsha Hanen

Woman as Artist: Papers in Honour of Marsha Hanen

Excerpt

This collection of essays is feminine in a number of ways: it has been made to honour a woman for her achievements on behalf of women; it is by women; it is about women; and it demonstrates, I believe, methods that are typical of women.

The collection honours Marsha Hanen, Dean of the Faculty of General Studies at the University of Calgary from 1986 to 1989, and now President of the University of Winnipeg. Marsha's interest in the arts is characteristic of both her public and her private life. Herself a fine pianist, she has always been a supporter of artistic enterprises, particularly those of women. We therefore hope that by bringing together this collection of essays about women as artists we shall both honour her and give her pleasure.

It is by women. Some of the contributors are among her oldest and closest friends. Some of us are women she has nurtured into scholarship by her advice and encouragement, and by her very practical help. All of us have at some time been her colleagues at the University of Calgary, but some are also practising artists, doing creative as well as scholarly work.

It is about women. The women discussed in these pages are of all kinds. There are painters, writers, dancers, musicians, teachers, and scholars. Many are Canadian and a fair number Albertan. Some lived in earlier times; others are still with us today. And finally, some are factual and some fictional.

But the work is feminine in quite another way as well. In "Rhetoric in a New Key" 1 Andrea Lunsford argues for the recognition of a new kind of rhetoric, one that is not monologic and hierarchical but dialogic and collaborative. It is multivocal, richly varied rather than being dominated by a single point of view. Such rhetoric, according to Lunsford, is typical of women and should be valued as such, not criticized for failing to meet the standards of traditional patriarchal writing. We like . . .

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