Rationalization of German Industry

Rationalization of German Industry

Rationalization of German Industry

Rationalization of German Industry

Excerpt

One of the outstanding developments in the field of economic thought and discussion since the World War is the growing consciousness of the economic inter-dependence among the nations. It is generally recognized that a national policy of isolation is no longer practicable in the economic sphere, whatever merit it may still possess as a political dogma. The industrial prosperity of one country is linked closely with that of other countries. In particular, American industry has become enmeshed in the world market. Its future growth and prosperity must depend to an increasing extent on the development of foreign markets for its surplus products. American industry is thus vitally concerned in all that affects the industrial strength, the competitive efficiency, and the consuming capacity of other, nations.

Developments in European industry in recent years have revolved about the idea of rationalization. This has been pronounced to be the primary essential in equipping a nation to hold its place in the competition of the world market. Its advocates believe that it has already accomplished great things and is destined to achieve greater. American industry, with its increasing dependence on the world market, cannot afford to remain indifferent to this development.

These considerations have led the National Industrial Conference Board to undertake a careful study of the rationalization of industry in the leading European countries. The doctrines of rationalization have been most widely accepted and applied in Germany. The rapid economic recovery of Germany during the last decade has made it one of the strongest industrial countries on the European continent. The products of German industries are sold throughout the world; the industrial equipment has been thoroughly organized; the currency has safely been placed on the gold basis; the foreign trade has increased at an . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.