Nanyo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945

Nanyo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945

Nanyo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945

Nanyo: The Rise and Fall of the Japanese in Micronesia, 1885-1945

Excerpt

The preface to any book is the first statement that an author makes to a reader, but it is usually the last part of the book to be written. Besides providing space to acknowledge authorial debts, it thus serves a retrospective, as well as a prefatory function, for it allows the author, after a long backward glance over the text, to offer a clear statement of purpose, in order to warn the unsuspecting, make explanations to the skeptical, and encourage the interested.

The writing of this particular book -- a history of the appearance, activities, and ultimate expulsion of the Japanese in Micronesia -- is linked to my research, past and present, in broader areas of modern Japanese history. It arose, essentially, from my interest in the evolution of Japanese expansionism and, more specifically, is an extension of my recent work in the history of the Japanese colonial empire, of which most of Micronesia once formed a part. It has also served as an introduction to my current interest in the development of the modern Japanese drive toward the Asian and Pacific tropics from late Meiji times until the beginning of the Pacific War.

It must be clear at the outset that what I have dealt with in these pages is a portion of Japanese history, specifically a small segment of the history of Japan's imperial expansion, which took place in a setting that was both exotic and geographically vast. It is equally important to make clear at the outset what I have not done. I have not attempted to write a history of Micronesia during the Japanese period, nor have I attempted to write a history of Micronesia or Micronesians under Japanese rule. As a specialst in modern Japanese history by training and interest, I hope that it is understandable that it is the Japanese, not the Micronesians, who come into sharpest focus under my lens. Yet there are undoubtedly those who will, with some reason, object that more space should have been devoted to the meaning of the Japanese presence and occupation . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.