Foundations of International Politics

Foundations of International Politics

Foundations of International Politics

Foundations of International Politics

Excerpt

A SUBJECT CALLED international relations began to appear in the curricula of American colleges and universities before World War I. These courses were taught chiefly by scholars trained in history and in international law, and reflected strongly the approaches and perspectives of those ancient and respected disciplines.

After World War I, international studies put out new branches. Formation of the League of Nations inspired the introduction of courses on international organization. The term international relations acquired new dimensions, some of them nonpolitical. Largely for this reason, some teachers and writers began to use the term international politics to denote the interactions and relations of organized national communities, especially those transactions which involved some element of opposition or resistance or struggle or conflict.

During the 1930's, scholars who specialized in international politics moved progressively away from the approaches and perspectives of diplomatic history and international law. Writing on international political subjects became more analytical, topical, and schematic. In this, international political analysts were following a trail blazed by some of the great pioneers in the development of social science. Broadly speaking, the trend was towards more formal modes of analysis, more explicit concepts, a growing collection of models and theories, and technical vocabularies.

Most of the recent writings on international politics reflect the influence of these newer tools and approaches. This book is no exception.

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