The Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians

The Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians

Read FREE!

The Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians

The Owl Sacred Pack of the Fox Indians

Read FREE!

Excerpt

Alfred Kiyana wrote the text containing the information appurtenant to the owl sacred pack (which was purchased from him by me in the spring of 1914 for Dr. Boas; it is now in the Berlin Museum für Völkerkunde) in the current syllabiary. I subsequently restored this according to the phonetics of Edward Davenport, with the exception. of the songs, which are given as pronounced by Alfred Kiyana. The translation is based on an Engglish version by Horace Poweshiek, corrected and supplemented by a grammaticial analysis of the text by myself.1 The meanings of the songs, however, are given as explained by Alfred Kiyana.

That the pack is genuine is certain by what I know of the contents of other Fox packs. That the information given in connection with it is authentic is shown by the fact that the myths and folk tales which I have obtained from Alfred Kiyana (such as those of Wi'SA-k'ä'A', the Apaiya'ci'Agki', Wâpa'sayA', the one whose father was the Sun, the Origin of the Months, the Bear and the Wife, the Youth who fasted too long and became a fish, Feather, Pitci'ca'A', Fox and Wolf) have checked up exceedingly well with corresponding ones obtained from other informants; as has the ethnological information (on gentile organization, the tribal dual division, marital and mortuary customs and observances, and ceremonial organization) obtained from him. Moreover, the kind of information given in the present text is much the same as that given by other informants regarding other packs. Lastly, Edward Davenport vouches for its authenticity.

The translation of the text has been made as literal as possible without violence to English idiomatic usage, as my plan has been to make this voltime serviceable not only to ethnological but also to linguistic students. No interlinear translation has been added, as three specimens of Fox interlinear texts have been published; and owing to the genius of Algonquian languages interlinears are typographically awkward. However, the list of stems occurring in the text is practically exhaustive; so that the serious student should have no difficulty in working out the Indian text.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.