Ad Fontes Lutheri: Toward the Recovery of the Real Luther: Essays in Honor of Kenneth Hagen's Sixty-Fifth Birthday

Ad Fontes Lutheri: Toward the Recovery of the Real Luther: Essays in Honor of Kenneth Hagen's Sixty-Fifth Birthday

Ad Fontes Lutheri: Toward the Recovery of the Real Luther: Essays in Honor of Kenneth Hagen's Sixty-Fifth Birthday

Ad Fontes Lutheri: Toward the Recovery of the Real Luther: Essays in Honor of Kenneth Hagen's Sixty-Fifth Birthday

Excerpt

Kenneth Hagen has long been an established expert in Luther studies and has long merited a Festschrift. Recently several of his past and current doctoral students conspired together to organize a Festschrift which would be presented to him as a surprise on a proper occasion. The key conspirators were Timothy Maschke, Franz Posset and Joan Skocir, all of whom have contributed essays as well as direction to this project. They asked me to write this Introduction, largely because I work in Reformation studies and have been at Marquette University nearly as long as Ken Hagen. I have co-operated with Ken on several projects over the years: for instance, presentations com-memorating the 500th anniversary of Luther's birth and hosting an annual meeting of the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference at Marquette. I have also served on several dissertation committees which he directed and published two volumes of Reformation Texts with Translations (1350–1650), which Hagen edits.

If one were to design an education for an American Luther scholar, it would be hard to better that of Hagen. He did his undergraduate work at Augsburg College in Minneapolis, a Lutheran college in America's most Lutheran metropolis. He then did a bachelor's degree in Sacred Theology at the Harvard Divinity School (1961), crowned by a doctorate in Divinity at Harvard University (1967). Most recipients of those degrees would have sought ordination; Hagen remained a lay scholar. While doing his dissertation research he spent a year at the University of Bonn. Can one be a Luther scholar without working in Germany? His dissertation, “Luther's Lectures on Hebrews in Light of Medieval Commentaries on Hebrews,” did much to shape the long range direction of his scholarship. His dissertation director at Harvard was Heiko Oberman, who has done more than any scholar to trace the importance of medieval roots of Luther's intellectual development. Hagen's first teaching experience was as a teaching Fellow at Harvard. From 1965 to 1967 he taught religion at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota.

In 1967 two people took a chance with long range consequences. Vatican II had just ended. American Catholic universities wanted to . . .

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