New Faiths, Old Fears: Muslims and Other Asian Immigrants in American Religious Life

New Faiths, Old Fears: Muslims and Other Asian Immigrants in American Religious Life

New Faiths, Old Fears: Muslims and Other Asian Immigrants in American Religious Life

New Faiths, Old Fears: Muslims and Other Asian Immigrants in American Religious Life

Excerpt

The principal subjects of this book are recent Asian immigrants to the United States, especially those who have come here since 1965. The passage of a major bill in that year dramatically increased the number of Asian immigrants. Yet their adjustment within American sociocultural as well as political economic space was complicated, in part because Asian immigrants were neither the intended nor the sole beneficiaries of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Act, also known as the Hart-Celler Act.

Latin American immigrants, for instance, almost doubled their percentage of the total pool of legal immigrants, while dominating the ranks of the illegal immigrants, between the 1950s and the 1990s. Four-fifths of all immigrants to the United States since 1970 have been either Latino or Asian, at the same time that arguments about immigration, and also about the cultural/religious loyalties of immigrants, have been channeled along disciplinary lines, reflecting the perspective of one academic field while too often ignoring quite different perspectives from other fields.

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