Twentieth Century Rumania

Twentieth Century Rumania

Twentieth Century Rumania

Twentieth Century Rumania

Excerpt

As the visitor to Rumania crosses the border from Hungary at Episcopia Bihorului and proceeds through Transylvania on his way to the capital city of Bucharest, he is impressed by the strange mixture of the old and the new, the Rumanian and the foreign. Oradea, his first stopping place, retains the character of an old Hungarian town. The countryside around it, despite the numerous television antennas, has lost little of the rural comforts of early twentieth century Hungary. The atmosphere begins to change on the road to Cluj, Transylvania's principal cultural center. The inner city, with its monuments and cultural institutions, its pastry shops and restaurants, has a central European character. But the surroundings show the effects of Rumanization and industrialization, of the homogenization of Rumania's society that has taken place in the last quarter of a century. Hungarians and Rumanians live side by side, not only in villages but also in the modern apartment buildings constructed for the industrial workers and technocracy. They coexist harmoniously, at least by prewar standards. There is much intermarriage. Their children attend primarily Rumanian language schools although there are a few schools in which the language of instruction is predominantly Magyar. The university bears the name Babes-Bolyai.

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