From Peasant to Farmer: A Revolutionary Strategy for Development

From Peasant to Farmer: A Revolutionary Strategy for Development

From Peasant to Farmer: A Revolutionary Strategy for Development

From Peasant to Farmer: A Revolutionary Strategy for Development

Excerpt

Over the past decade, it has become increasingly clear that most poor nations are not developing, at least not at the rate that planners and policymakers had anticipated. This is alarming, especially in view of the large sums spent on technical and other aid to these countries and the attention given to development problems by scholars and research institutions all over the world. In the late 1960s more than two-thirds of the world's population lived in some eighty countries whose annual product per capita ranged from $50 to $300, an amount considered less than enough to provide the basic necessities of life. Moreover, there is no indication that conditions will change markedly in the foreseeable future for this large section of mankind.

For two decades, scholars have been giving considerable attention to the study of the development process, and many attempts have been made to analyze its motive powers and attendant phenomena. Most of these attempts have centered on the analysis of past trends in the advanced countries and the possibility of the application of these trends to the present situation of the developing countries. But the knowledge gained from studying both the achievements of the advanced countries and the failures of backward ones has not led to the formulation of a general conceptual scheme from which practical solutions to the basic problems of underdevelopment can be derived.

Development is fundamentally a process of change that involves the . . .

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