A Short History of English: With a Bibliography of Recent Books on the Subject, and Lists of Texts and Editions

A Short History of English: With a Bibliography of Recent Books on the Subject, and Lists of Texts and Editions

A Short History of English: With a Bibliography of Recent Books on the Subject, and Lists of Texts and Editions

A Short History of English: With a Bibliography of Recent Books on the Subject, and Lists of Texts and Editions

Excerpt

It is now thirteen years since the first edition of this book appeared, and the revision of it, first contemplated six or seven years ago, has been delayed by the urgency of other work. It is a satisfaction to me to feel that whatever the drawbacks of procrastination, which in this case has entailed repeated reprinting of the book in almost its original form, this new edition has gained considerably by the delay. I refer in particular to the completion of two considerable pieces of investigation with which I have been associated, carried out by former pupils-- that on the West Midland Dialects of Middle English, by Dr. Mary Serjeantson of Lady Margaret Hall, and that on the History of the Early London Dialect (including that of the adjacent areas) by Miss B. Mackenzie, B.Litt., of Somerville College. A brief abstract of the former has appeared during the present year (1927) in the Review of English Studies, while the latter is being prepared for publication and will, I hope, appear shortly. Both of these monographs are attempts to answer questions which confronted myself and my pupils in the course of our work on the innumerable problems of M.E. Grammar. Although I have, as I believe, always specifically acknowledged the help derived from the work of others in the course of the present book, I wish to record here how much I owe to both the afore-mentioned ladies, in respect of minute details and more general pieces of information drawn from their copious stores of material, and for the many references to texts and monographs with which they have supplied me. Miss Mackenzie's work on the London dialect carries the conclusions obtained by Heuser in his Alt-London several stages farther, and the general result, which I have attempted to summarize in the proper place below, is I believe to clear up much that was formerly obscure.

I only wish that minute surveys on the same scale as these two on West-Midland and on the London-Middlesex area . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.