English and American Furniture: A Pictorial Handbook of Fine Furniture Made in Great Britain and in the American Colonies, Some in the Sixteenth Century but Principally in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

English and American Furniture: A Pictorial Handbook of Fine Furniture Made in Great Britain and in the American Colonies, Some in the Sixteenth Century but Principally in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

English and American Furniture: A Pictorial Handbook of Fine Furniture Made in Great Britain and in the American Colonies, Some in the Sixteenth Century but Principally in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

English and American Furniture: A Pictorial Handbook of Fine Furniture Made in Great Britain and in the American Colonies, Some in the Sixteenth Century but Principally in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries

Excerpt

The credit for the scheme of the book is due to Henry W. Frohne, formerly Editor of Good Furniture Magazine. The photographs illustrating it are from the collection of the late George Leland Hunter who was to have carried the book to completion.

The original idea was of much wider scope, and had Hunter lived, there is no doubt that the book would have been larger and better. The plan which he outlined, to trace the development of furniture from the days of ancient Egypt up to the present day, illustrating examples not only from England and America, but also from the nations of antiquity, also from Italy, France and Germany, was an ambitious one, but George Leland Hunter was one who could have carried it out, as he possessed industry and erudition. The book which is now presented to the general SYSTEM has been greatly contracted.

When Hunter's photographs and notes came to hand with the scheme of the book, the idea occurred to me that a simple handbook of furniture, in which native American and English examples were illustrated, side by side, might have an appeal, and it was all the book which I felt I was competent to write. I had the disadvantage that the valuable information which Hunter possessed of his photographed examples, had died with him. In addition, he had projected the illustration of modern-made American furniture (for which he had collected many examples) about which I knew nothing. These latter I have rejected, but I have been compelled to accept Hunter's photographs with any faults or inaccuracies they may possess. I had, nor have, no opportunity of examining the actual pieces themselves, but I have selected, to the best of my ability, examples which are true to their genus, as far as I could judge.

The book is intended for practical use, and stress is laid upon the comparative lesson which each example teaches, with as little of the academic and historical element as possible. To say how . . .

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