Self-Presentation: Impression Management and Interpersonal Behavior

Self-Presentation: Impression Management and Interpersonal Behavior

Self-Presentation: Impression Management and Interpersonal Behavior

Self-Presentation: Impression Management and Interpersonal Behavior

Synopsis

Provides an up-to-date analysis of the effects of self-presentation on behaviour. This text integrates the latest research from personality, social, organisational and health psychology.

Excerpt

This book is about the ways in which human behavior is affected by people's concerns with their public impressions. No matter what else people may be doing, they typically prefer that other people perceive them in certain desired ways and not perceive them in other, undesired ways. Put simply, human beings have a pervasive and ongoing concern with their self-presentations. Sometimes they act in certain ways just to make a particular impression on someone else—as when a job applicant responds in ways that will satisfactorily impress the interviewer. But more often, people's concerns with others' impressions simply constrain their behavioral options. Most of the time we are not inclined to do things that will lead others to see us as incompetent, immoral, maladjusted, or otherwise socially undesirable. As a result, our concerns with others' impressions limit what we are willing to do. Self-presentational motives underlie and pervade nearly every corner of interpersonal life.

Herein lies an interesting paradox. Virtually everyone is attentive to, if not explicitly concerned about how he or she is perceived and evaluated by other people. Yet most people try to deny that they are personally bothered by such superficial concerns with public appearances. We sometimes suspect that other people are "putting on a show"—they are not as smart/wealthy/competent/ethical/connected/etc. as they try to appear. But, with a few exceptions, most of us deny that we put on similar shows for the various audiences we encounter throughout the day. Of course, such denials are, themselves, often self-presentational. To achieve our goals in social life, we must assure that others take our public impressions at face value—that they do not doubt that we are who and what we appear to be. (This is one hazard of doing self-presentational research; people assume that a psychologist who studies self‐ presentation must be a particularly fervid impression manager.)

One theme of this book is that, far from being a sign of insecurity, vanity, or shallowness, a certain degree of concern for one's public impressions is essential for smooth and successful social interaction. That's not to say that such concerns aren't sometimes inappropriate . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.