Sources of Korean Tradition - Vol. 1

Sources of Korean Tradition - Vol. 1

Sources of Korean Tradition - Vol. 1

Sources of Korean Tradition - Vol. 1

Synopsis

Drawn from Peter H. Lee's Sourcebook of Korean Civilization, Volume I, this abridged introductory collection offers students and general readers primary readings in the social, intellectual, and religious traditions of Korea from ancient times through the sixteenth century. Sources of Korean Tradition is arranged according to the major epochs of Korean history, including sections on: Korean culture - its origins, writing, education, poetry, song, social life, and rituals; religion - the rise of Buddhism and Confucianism; the economy - the land, agriculture, commerce, and currency; and its changing political structures. A superb collection by the foremost scholars in the field, Sources of Korean Tradition is supplemented by a bibliography and prefaces by both editors. An impressive storehouse for the grand corpus of thought, beliefs, and customs held by people of Korea for centuries, this volume is a valuable companion for those interested in the history of Korea and East Asian studies.

Excerpt

This book is a selective abridgement of the Sourcebook of Korean Civilization, Volume I, published by Columbia University Press in 1993, with substantial deletions from and some significant additions to it. Our purpose is to make accessible a selection from the great array of documentary materials in that Sourcebook, in a form roughly comparable to that used in the volumes in the Introduction to Asian Civilizations series, namely, Sources of Chinese Tradition, Sources of Indian Tradition, and Sources of Japanese Tradition. The latter works were prepared as source materials to be read alongside general historical accounts of these civilizations, and to give readers some sense of how major historical and cultural developments were viewed by participants in or observers of them.

The Sources have been used for this purpose by students both of individual cultures and of larger cultural configurations such as East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, the original intention of this series being not simply to advance the study of individual cultures but to promote the inclusion of Asia in general education and, even more specifically, in programs of study designed as part of the core curriculum. Here the concept of core emphasizes not so much breadth as centrality and a concentration on key features. For these purposes, then, our main criterion has been what ideas, practices, and institutions contribute to the process of civilization, especially as they . . .

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