Love in a Green Shade: Idyllic Romances Ancient to Modern

Love in a Green Shade: Idyllic Romances Ancient to Modern

Love in a Green Shade: Idyllic Romances Ancient to Modern

Love in a Green Shade: Idyllic Romances Ancient to Modern

Synopsis

Love in a Green Shade examines for the first time in depth the reception history of Daphnis and Chloe in literature, beginning with its Renaissance rediscovery and working through its various transformations in English, French, Spanish, and other literatures. At the same time, Richard F. Hardin launches a groundbreaking exploration of the 06idyllic romance tradition in fiction and drama.

While Virgil and Theocritus begot a tradition of poetry concerned with male eroticism, idyllic romance centers on the couple in a story pointing toward marriage. In addition to Daphnis and Chloe, this study considers numerous works influenced by the idyllic romance tradition, including Shakespeare's The Tempest, Milton's Paradise Lost, Jacques-Henri Bernardin's Paul et Virginie, Harriet Beecher Stowe's The Pearl of Orr's Island, Willa Cather's O Pioneers!, novels by George Sand, Thomas Hardy, and Pardo Bazan, Louis Hemon's Maria Chapdelaine, and Yukio Mishima's The Sound of Waves.

Excerpt

Although no previous book exists concerning the influence of Daphnis and Chloe in literature, such is not the case with my parallel subject, the genre of idyllic or pastoral romance. Besides the many treatments of pastoral in Renaissance studies, several welcome books on the Victorian idyllic tradition have appeared. An interest in locale predominates in W. J. Keith's Regions of the Imagination: The Development of British Rural Fiction, a work that examines a body of fiction from which imaginary "pastoral" regions are excluded. Shelagh Hunter's Victorian Idyllic Fiction: Pastoral Strategies— strongly influenced by William Empson's idea of the complex in the simple —is valuable for its treatment of George Sand's influence and the "village sketch" tradition. In Idyllic Realism from Mary Russell Mitford to Hardy, P. D. Edwards analyzes a tradition of "realistic idyll" that "not merely turns potential tragedy and heroic passion into comedy but implicitly denies the existence of the tragedy and heroic passion, whether in art or in life" (3). In a more general discussion, pastoral narrative—especially Daphnis and Chloe—profitably occupies the last two chapters of Paul Alpers's What Is Pastoral?

For my understanding of Daphnis and Chloe's reception history, I owe great debts to Giles Barber's absorbing bibliographical study, "Daphnis and Chloe": The Markets and Metamorphoses of an Unknown Bestseller, and to Maria Ferrini's Bibliografia di Longo, "Dafni e Cloe." I also use certain lists of works that evidence Longus's influence in literature and other forms of art from the past two centuries, the fullest inventory being the "Nachleben" appendix to Otto Schönberger's edition, Hirtengeschichten von Daphnis und Chloe. Margaret Anne Doody's The True Story of the Novel has focused long- needed attention on the Greek romance backgrounds of the "novel"; I am . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.