Development in the Third World: From Policy Failure to Policy Reform

Development in the Third World: From Policy Failure to Policy Reform

Development in the Third World: From Policy Failure to Policy Reform

Development in the Third World: From Policy Failure to Policy Reform

Synopsis

This book is a study of Third World economic development and the factors which have made development so elusive. It discusses the policy reform necessary to spur development as well as the relationship between development theory and policy. The author argues that the key to successful development policy is through reduced state intervention, and that to the extent state intervention is necessary, it should be through rather than against the market mechanism.

Excerpt

Professor Kempe Ronald Hope has been a distinguished and continual contributor to relevant and practical thinking and action in the administration and acceleration of economic development of less developed countries. the theoretical underpinnings of his work always remain rigorous. Yet the contributions of Professor Hope, to getting on with the job of making development an ongoing process in Third World countries, are earthily realistic and immediately applicable, given a determination to develop, and given the skills, ingenuities, and the character that the development process requires.

The urgency of the development situation, which Professor Hope advocates, is such that development, in my view, could probably be regarded as making the improbable possible now. Populations explode and the economic and social condition of millions are so desperate that people want development ideals to be satisfied within their lifetime. the pressure is always for development now. Hungry, undereducated, unemployed, underhoused, inequitably taxed, inflation-burdened, and opportunity-constrained people can hardly be told that in the long run all will be well. Dead people in the long run cannot enjoy development, and for obvious reasons. Calculations, however necessary, of where any developing economy will be a hundred years from now do not alleviate the contemporary distress of the marginal millions. These marginal millions, referred to in my The Economics of Latin America: Development Problems in Perspective (New York: Harper and Row, 1972, pp. 78-79), remain factored out of organized institutional linkages in their own society and are therefore factored out of contributive economic and social decision making essential for the promotion of economic development.

We have, so far, found no magical, universally applicable model for jump-starting and transforming the behavior of the poor economy. Vocal ideologues on the right assumed that neo—laissez faire was the only essential for economic transformation. Vocal ideologues on the left assumed that neocomplete command approaches would achieve development objectives, while simultaneously introducing purifying ethics into individual and social relationships. in the prevailing pas-

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