The Cash Boy, or, Frank Fowler's Early Struggles

The Cash Boy, or, Frank Fowler's Early Struggles

Read FREE!

The Cash Boy, or, Frank Fowler's Early Struggles

The Cash Boy, or, Frank Fowler's Early Struggles

Read FREE!

Excerpt

A group of boys were assembled in an open field to the west of the public school house in the town of Crawford. Most of them held hats in their hands, while two, stationed sixty feet distant from each other, were "having a catch."

It was easy to see that a common interest in the national game of baseball had drawn them together.

Tom Pinkerton, son of Deacon Pinkerton, had just returned from a visit to his mother's cousin in the city of Brooklyn, and while there had witnessed a match game between two professional clubs. He proposed that the boys of Crawford should establish a club, to be known as the Excelsior Club of Crawford, to play among themselves, and on suitable occasions to challenge clubs belonging to other villages. This proposal was received with instant approval.

"I move that Tom Pinkerton address the meeting," said one boy, who had picked up a little parliamentary language.

"Second the motion," said another.

Tom Pinkerton, who was in his own estimation a personage of considerable importance, came forward in a consequential manner, and commenced as follows:

"You all know what has brought us together. We want to start a club for playing baseball, like the big clubs."

"How shall we do it?" asked Henry Scott.

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