The Rise of the Corporate Commonwealth: U.S. Business and Public Policy in the Twentieth Century

The Rise of the Corporate Commonwealth: U.S. Business and Public Policy in the Twentieth Century

The Rise of the Corporate Commonwealth: U.S. Business and Public Policy in the Twentieth Century

The Rise of the Corporate Commonwealth: U.S. Business and Public Policy in the Twentieth Century

Excerpt

It has recently become fashionable to bemoan the inflexibility and inefficiency of American business and political institutions. The attacks are mounted by business school pundits who are themselves under assault for having contributed to the nation's current problems, by liberal commentators who have traditionally been skeptical of business contributions to American society, and by a potpourri of writers who are feeding on the current widespread anxiety about the nation's economic outlook. Their diagnoses are varied. But all seem agreed that the patient is seriously, perhaps terminally, ill.

History tells us that the plans for the funeral are a bit premature. The business system in the United States has weathered just this sort of crisis before; the current difficulties are in fact the second such major challenge that the American system has experienced in this century. Throughout its history that system has been unusually flexible. Our business and governmental institutions have changed . . .

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