Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet

Cyberwars: Espionage on the Internet

Synopsis

To some a brand-new forum for the freedom of speech, the Internet is also the most up-to-date way to gather intelligence. Brilliant hackers like Kevin Mitnik -- modern-day "pirates" -- pose real security threats to government and industry. Cyberwars explores a dangerous new world where international terrorists plot their attacks and are tracked by secret service organizations on-line, drug traffickers do business and launder money, and electronic economic espionage is the order of the day. Examining efforts to police on-line communication and content, Guisnel assesses the implications of pervasive surveillance for the inherently democratic medium of the Internet. As these issues are the focus of ongoing debates in government and the private sector, Cyberwars couldn't be more timely.

Excerpt

On February 21, 1994, at the corner of Quebec Street and Nelly Curtis Drive, in Arlington, Virginia, a man with a mustache eased his Jaguar to a stop. He didn't have a choice: another car was blocking his way, strangely motionless at a green light. Sitting there, he could've been an accountant, or maybe an insurance salesman, some guy in a big car, wide-eyed behind heavy glasses. And after he'd been yanked from inside and found his hands suddenly slammed against the hood by powerful arms that had come out of nowhere, this diminutive CIA chief who loved a drink perhaps a little more than he should have didn't look like a big shot at all. When the counterespionage agents were cuffing him and giving him the lowdown on why he was being arrested, he said the only thing he could think of: "There must be some mistake. Espionage, me?"

Aldrich Ames, the greatest traitor the CIA had bred since its creation at the end of the Second World War, had over the course of a decade caused the arrest of dozens of the CIA's Russian operatives, ten of whom had later been executed. Just five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Ames's life sentence . . .

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