Deadly Choices: Coping with Health Risks in Everyday Life

Deadly Choices: Coping with Health Risks in Everyday Life

Deadly Choices: Coping with Health Risks in Everyday Life

Deadly Choices: Coping with Health Risks in Everyday Life

Excerpt

For two and a half years, I had a dull headache at breakfast time. It didn't happen every morning, and it always went away by lunch. I wouldn't call it a migraine. It wasn't even a splitting headache. I couldn't figure out what caused that vague feeling of fullness behind my eyes at about 6:45 A.M. Finally, I made the diagnosis.

The exact date eludes me, but my symptom began during the summer of 1990. My wife and I had always gotten up early, to drink coffee and read the newspapers. Then we'd awaken the two children, and our family would have breakfast together. I was forty-two years old, and I had just sworn off scrambled eggs. I was trying to lower my blood cholesterol level by eating a double portion of oatmeal every morning. At first, I thought that my headache was an egg withdrawal reaction. I resumed eating scrambled eggs, and even tried a cheese omelette, but with no relief. We had switched to filtered coffee because of its purported cholesterol-lowering effect. But a temporary return to the pot-brewed variety left my symptom unchanged. Anyway, the oat bran craze seemed to be fading. A few months earlier, new research studies had failed to confirm its salutary influence on blood cholesterol levels. So I stopped the oatmeal. But the headaches still came. A toasted English muffin, dabbed with margarine, turned my vague sensation of . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.