Remembering the Answers: Essays on the American Student Revolt

Remembering the Answers: Essays on the American Student Revolt

Remembering the Answers: Essays on the American Student Revolt

Remembering the Answers: Essays on the American Student Revolt

Excerpt

How does a radical, a mild radical, it is true, but still one who felt closer to radical than to liberal writers and politicians in the late 1950's, end up a conservative, a mild conservative, but still closer to those who call themselves conservative than to those who call themselves liberal in early 1970? I seem to have moved from a position in which I was somewhat embarrassed to be considered liberal (surely I was a degree further left than that!) to a position where I am once again embarrassed, but from quite a different perspective.

One way of explaining this change is to describe what it was to be a mild radical in the late 1950's. Consider the writers who were considered radical: Paul Goodman, Dwight Macdonald, Irving Howe, Michael Harrington, C. Wright Mills. In those days, before and just after the Cuban revolution, there was one continuum that connected quite a range of positions, beginning left of liberalism. Consider the kinds of actions that mild radicals engaged in then. One . . .

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