Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology

Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology

Excerpt

Feminist Art Criticism begins with Maryse Holder's blunt and lush language analyzing and interpreting the significance of female sexuality as a ground of freedom. "Another Cuntree: At Last, a Mainstream Female Art Movement" exemplifies the tone and developing theory—often more implicit than explicit—of the early 1970s, when the Women's Movement, having seeded the art world since the late 1960s, was bearing rich fruit.

Holder asserts the primacy of women's experience. Her exuberant belief in the body, her stunning consciousness regarding sexuality and her use of "dirty" words all belong to a feminist effort in art to show connections between art and social, human, and individual experience. Holder, along with many women artists, was engaged in what has been called reclaiming. This process has involved the use of words, subjects, and images that many feminists consider potent and authentic for women despite the devolution of such language into "inappropriateness." Affirming the feminist maxim that "the personal is political," Holder and others have known that the exploration of intimate arenas can reveal both the private and public power of woman.

Holder's passionate voice may not sound theoretical, but it is, for theory is not simply academic intellectualization written in neutral(ized) language; and a quintessential part of feminist theory lives in the writing of women who, having responded passionately to circumstances in their own and other women's lives, have analyzed and abstracted from those particulars without losing the passion.

The essays in Feminist Art Criticism are theoretical, and we selected them for several reasons. First, they show a diversity of concerns. These include spirituality, sexuality, the representation of woman in art, the necessary interrelationship of theory and action, women as artmakers, ethnicity, language itself, so-called postfeminism and critiques of the art world, the discipline of art history and the practice of art criticism. Second, the contributors' work has not been either widely disseminated or readily available. Third, the essays, especially arranged as they are (chronologically), demonstrate a continuous feminist discourse in art from the early 1970s through the present, a discourse that is neither monolithic nor . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.