Birds of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kobuk, and Old Crow: A Study in Arctic Adaptation

Birds of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kobuk, and Old Crow: A Study in Arctic Adaptation

Birds of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kobuk, and Old Crow: A Study in Arctic Adaptation

Birds of Anaktuvuk Pass, Kobuk, and Old Crow: A Study in Arctic Adaptation

Excerpt

The observations on which I have based these studies were made during expeditions for physiological investigations of adaptation to the arctic Alaskan climate. These were supported by the Office of Naval Research, through the Arctic Research Laboratory, from 1947 to 1949 and by the United States Public Health Service, through the Arctic Health Research Center, after 1949.

I am also grateful to the Arctic Institute of North America for a grant, from funds provided by the Office of Naval Research, to assist our biological reconnaissance at Old Crow in 1957, and for grants from the Explorers Club in aid of the reconnaissance on the Ahlasuruk in 1953 and at Old Crow in 1957.

Sig Wien, President of Wien Alaska Airways, whose many years of arctic flying has brought him a thorough understanding of the features of the country, and Thomas Brower of Barrow, whose keen understanding of life on the arctic coast had led him to suspect that many birds reached there by migration through the mountains of the Alaskan interior, were instrumental in leading me to choose the central Brooks range as the key to the faunal situation in arctic Alaska.

Thomas P. Brower of Barrow, son of Charles Brower, also pointed out to me the probable significance of the mountain passes as migratory routes of the birds which he knows so well on the Arctic Coast and related to me many pieces of information, sustaining that view, derived from his own observations on the coast and accounts of Eskimo travelers in the interior. In 1949 he made extensive collections and observations for me at Anaktuvuk which early presented an outline of the migration. Since that time his friendly advice has repeatedly helped to sustain my studies of arctic Alaskan animals.

Since 1950 my colleague John Krog has joined me in physiological studies of the effects of arctic temperature. I owe to him many long- sustained observations, and I have gained from him many clear views of arctic life which were supported by his vigor and skill in combining experimentation in the field with studies in the laboratory.

My colleague at Point Barrow, and later in Anchorage, Raymond Hock, has given me much assistance from his observations at Tuluak Lake during a few days in the spring of 1948, and from his observations on land and from the air in the lower Colville Valley during that summer.

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