Women in Archaeology

Women in Archaeology

Women in Archaeology

Women in Archaeology

Synopsis

Women in Archaeology documents and discusses attempts to exclude women from the discipline of archaeology and the resulting androcentrism of archaeological knowledge.

Excerpt

Cheryl Claassen

Why a book of articles specifically about women archaeologists? Life experiences moderate choices throughout one's life. Of significance to the discipline of archaeology are the choices of career, school, mentor, and specialization. Within the practice of science, life experiences have been shown to influence choices at all steps of the scientific cycle -- problem selection, hypothesis, explanation, theory, method, technique, even bibliography. Gender is a significant element in life experience, one that is currently undergoing a great deal of scrutiny in archaeology. These authors explore the relationship between gender and choices made in the work of archaeology.

Numerous articles have demonstrated the link between gender and the pursuit of college and graduate schooling and gender and career choice. Garrow et al. (this volume) discuss gender and mentors in archaeology and numerous studies demonstrate the positive influences women mentors bring to women and men students. Gender influences fieldwork opportunities (Bender 1991; Preucel and Chesson, this volume; Wurtzburg, this volume) and excavation skills (Sweely, this volume). Gender influences role choice in archaeology with a greater proportion of women choosing laboratory specialties and, in the past, laboratory/museum jobs and analytical methods such as floral, lithic edgewear, faunal, bead, and ceramic analyses. Gender has been shown to be a significant factor in the acquisition of technical skills such as those provided by physics, chemistry, and astronomy. The type of analysis a woman feels competent to do governs her choice of research problem as does her mentor, geographical location (more often cited by women than by men to explain a number of phenomena), fieldwork opportunities, peer group, and role models, all influenced by gender. Beaudry (this volume) provides information on the citation of women's writing that strongly suggests gender even influences who gets cited, as . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.