James Thurber

James Thurber, 1894–1961, American humorist, b. Columbus, Ohio, studied at Ohio State Univ. After working on various newspapers he served on the staff of the New Yorker from 1927 to 1933 and was later a principal contributor to the magazine, considerably influencing its tone through his various drawings, stories, and anecdotes of his misadventures. Beneath the vague outlines of Thurber's cartoons and the wistful and ironic improbabilities of his writings—often dealing with incidents and characters from his Midwestern childhood or with the vexed relationship between the sexes—there is a deep psychological insight that sets him apart from most 20th-century humorists.

With E. B. White he wrote and illustrated Is Sex Necessary? (1929), a satire of books on popular psychoanalysis. The Male Animal (1940), a play he wrote with Elliott Nugent, satirizes collegiate life. Collections of his drawings and writings include The Owl in the Attic (1931), The Seal in the Bedroom (1932), My Life and Hard Times (1933), Fables for Our Time (1940), The Thurber Carnival (1945), Thurber Country (1953), Thurber's Dogs (1955), The Wonderful O (1957), and Credos and Curios (1962). Among his other works are The Thirteen Clocks (1950), a children's book, and The Years with Ross (1959), a memoir of his days with the New Yorker. Thurber's later career was hampered by his growing blindness.

See H. Thurber and E. Weeks, ed., Selected Letters of James Thurber (1981) and H. Kinney and R. A. Thurber, ed., The Thurber Letters (2003); biographies by C. S. Holmes (1972), B. Bernstein (1975, repr. 1985), R. E. Long (1988), N. A. Grauer (1994), and H. Kinney (1995).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

James Thurber: Selected full-text books and articles

Remember Laughter: A Life of James Thurber By Neil A. Grauer University of Nebraska Press, 1994
The Thurber Method By Heitman, Danny Humanities, Vol. 36, No. 1, January/February 2015
His Secret Life By Buckley, F. H New Criterion, Vol. 22, No. 2, October 2003
The Twelve Dancing Princesses, and Other Fairy Tales By Mary Elizabeth Meek; Alfred David Indiana University Press, 1974
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Fantastic Worlds: Myths, Tales, and Stories By Eric S. Rabkin Oxford University Press, 1979
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Comic in Theory & Practice By John J. Enck; Elizabeth T. Forter; Alvin Whitley Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1960
The Saturday Review Treasury By John Haverstick Simon and Schuster, 1957
Librarian's tip: Cartoons by James Thurber begin on p. 19
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Patterns in Modern Drama: Ibsen, Chekhov, Galsworthy, O'Neill, Kelly, Thurber, Nugent, Hellman By Lodwick Hartley; Arthur Ladu Prentice-Hall, 1948
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
105 Greatest Living Authors Present the World's Best Stories, Humor, Drama, Biography, History, Essays, Poetry By Whit Burnett Dial Press, 1950
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
America's 93 Greatest Living Authors Present This Is My Best: Over 150 Self-Chosen and Complete Masterpieces, Together with Their Reasons for Their Selections By Whit Burnett Dial Press, 1942
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Columbia Companion to the Twentieth-Century American Short Story By Blanche H. Gelfant; Lawrence Graver Columbia University Press, 2000
"Things Close In": Dissolution and Misanthropy in "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty." By Kaufman, Anthony Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 22, No. 1, Spring 1994
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Secret Life of Willy Loman: A Miller-Thurber Connection By Koprince, Susan The Midwest Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 4, Summer 2012
Encyclopedia of the Essay By Tracy Chevalier Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.