Books, Wha – Whe

Questia offers more than 83,000 full-text books in our collection. You can search them by title or keyword, or browse them all here alphabetically.

What the Body Cost: Desire, History, and Performance By Jane Blocker. University of Minnesota Press, 2004
What the Negro Thinks By Robert Russa Moton. Doubleday, Doran and company, inc., 1929
What the Slaves Ate: Recollections of African American Foods and Foodways from the Slave Narratives By Herbert C. Covey, Dwight Eisnach. Greenwood, 2009
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What the South Americans Think of Us By Carleton Beals, Bryce Oliver, Herschel Brickell, Samuel Guy Inman. R. M. McBride & Company, 1945
What the Tariff Means to American Industries By Percy W. Bidwell. Harcourt Brace and Company, 1956
What They Saw...At the Hour of Death By Karlis Osis, Erlendur Haraldsson. Hastings House, 1997 (3rd edition)
What Veblen Taught: Selected Writings of Thorstein Veblen By Thorstein Veblen, Wesley C. Mitchell. Viking Press, 1936
What Was Freedom's Price? Essays By Willie Lee Rose, Joel Williamson, Richard Sutch, Roger Ransom, George M. Fredrickson, C. Vann Woodward, David G. Sansing. University Press of Mississippi, 1978
What Was Naturalism?: Materials for an Answer By Edward Stone. Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1959
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next? By Katherine Verdery. Princeton University Press, 1996
What We Are Becoming: Developments in Undergraduate Writing Majors By Greg A. Giberson, Thomas A. Moriarty. Utah State University Press, 2010
What We Mean by Experience By Marianne Janack. Stanford University Press, 2012
What We Must Know about Communism By Bonaro Overstreet, Bonaro W. Overstreet, Harry Overstreet. W. W. Norton, 1958
What We Owe Iraq: War and the Ethics of Nation Building By Noah Feldman. Princeton University Press, 2006 (New edition)
What Went Wrong with Perestroika By Marshall I. Goldman. W. W. Norton, 1992 (Updated edition)
What Went Wrong with Perestroika By Marshall I. Goldman. W. W. Norton, 1991
FREE! What Wilson Did at Paris By Ray Stannard Baker. Doubleday Page & Co., 1920
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What Women Watched: Daytime Television in the 1950s By Marsha F. Cassidy. University of Texas Press, 2005
What Works for Whom? A Critical Review of Psychotherapy Research By Anthony Roth, Peter Fonagy. Guilford Press, 2005 (2nd edition)
What Works for Women at Work: Four Patterns Working Women Need to Know By Joan C. Williams, Rachel Dempsey. New York University Press, 2014
What Works in Girls' Education: Evidence and Policies from the Developing World By Barbara Herz, Gene B. Sperling. Council on Foreign Relations Press, 2004
What Works in Schools: Translating Research into Action By Robert J. Marzano. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2003
What World Religions Teach By E. G. Parrinder. George G. Harrap, 1963
What You Will: Gender, Contract, and Shakespearean Social Space By Kathryn Schwarz. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011
Whatever Gets You through the Night: A Story of Sheherezade and the Arabian Entertainments By Andrei Codrescu. Princeton University Press, 2011
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Whatever Goes Up: The Hazardous Fortunes of a Natural Born Gambler By George C. Tyler, J. C. Furnas. The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1934
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Whatever Happened to the Soul? Scientific and Theological Portraits of Human Nature By Warren S. Brown, Nancey Murphy, H. Newton Malony. Fortress Press, 1998
What's Ahead for American Business By Sumner H. Slichter. Little, Brown and Company, 1951
What's Eating You? People and Parasites By Eugene H. Kaplan. Princeton University Press, 2010
What's Good for Business: Business and American Politics since World War II By Kim Phillips-Fein, Julian E. Zelizer. Oxford University Press, 2012
What's Good on TV? Understanding Ethics through Television By Jamie Carlin Watson, Robert Arp. Wiley-Blackwell, 2011
What's Left of Theory? New Work on the Politics of Literary Theory By John Guillory, Kendall Thomas, Judith Butler. Routledge, 2000
What's My Name? Black Vernacular Intellectuals By Grant Farred. University of Minnesota Press, 2003
What's News: The Media in American Society By Elie Abel. Institute for Contemporary Studies, 1981
What's Normal? Narratives of Mental and Emotional Disorders By Carol Donley, Sheryl Buckley. Kent State University Press, 2000
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What's O'Clock By Amy Lowell. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1925
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What's Queer about Europe? Productive Encounters and Re-Enchanting Paradigms By Mireille Rosello, Sudeep Dasgupta. Fordham University Press, 2014
What's So and What Isn't By John M. Work. Vanguard Press, 1927
What's the Matter with New York: A National Problem By Norman Thomas, Paul Blanshard. The Macmillan Company, 1932
What's the Matter with the Internet? By Mark Poster. University of Minnesota Press, 2001
What's These Worlds Coming to? By Jean-Luc Nancy, Aurélien Barrau, Travis Holloway, Flor Méchain. Fordham University Press, 2015
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
What's Within?: Nativism Reconsidered By Fiona Cowie. Oxford University Press, 1999
What's Wrong with Children's Rights By Martin Guggenheim. Harvard University Press, 2005
What's Wrong with the Rorschach? Science Confronts the Controversial Inkblot Test By James M. Wood, M. Teresa Nezworski, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Howard N. Garb. Jossey-Bass, 2003
FREE! What's Wrong with the World By G. K. Chesterton. Cassell & Company, 1913
FREE! What's Wrong with the World By Gilbert K. Chesterton. Dodd Mead and Company, 1910
The Wheatley Manuscript: A Collection of Middle English Verse and Prose Contained in a Ms. Now in the British Museum, Add. Mss. 39574 By Mabel S. Day. Early English Text Society, 1921
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! The Wheel of Life By Ellen Glasgow. Doubleday Page & Company, 1906
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Wheels and Butterflies By W. B. Yeats. Macmillan & Co., 1935
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll By H. G. Wells. The Macmillan Company, 1913
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
FREE! When a Man Comes to Himself By Woodrow Wilson. Harper & Brothers, 1915
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.