Frank Harris

Frank Harris, 1856–1931, British-American author, b. Galway, Ireland. He studied at the Univ. of Kansas, became a U.S. citizen, and returning to England, edited successively a number of periodicals. A controversial figure in both his private life and his writings, he is primarily known for his scandalously frank and highly unreliable autobiography, My Life and Loves (3 vol., 1923–27), which was banned in the United States and England for many years. Much of his other work, such as his first novel, The Bomb (1908), shows a similar leaning toward eroticism. His biographical series Contemporary Portraits (1915–27), portraying such men as Shaw, Wells, Galsworthy, and Kipling, many of whom he knew, and his biography of Oscar Wilde (1916) reveal his facility for maliciousness and imaginative speculation. Among his other works are the volume of short stories, Montes the Matador (1900), and the novel Great Days (1913).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Frank Harris: Selected full-text books and articles

Bernard Shaw, Frank Harris & Oscar Wilde
Robert Harborough Sherard.
Greystone Press, 1937
Bernard Shaw
Frank Harris.
Book League of America, 1931
Anarchy & Culture: The Aesthetic Politics of Modernism
David Weir.
University of Massachusetts Press, 1997
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Frank Harris begins on p. 110
Chronicles of Barabbas, 1884-1934
George H. Doran.
Harcourt Brace and Company, 1935
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Frank Harris begins on p. 297
Living Authors: A Book of Biographies
Stanley Kunitz; Dilly Tante.
H. W. Wilson, 1935
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Frank Harris begins on p. 170
Bosie, Lord Alfred Douglas, His Friends and Enemies
Rupert Croft-Cooke.
Bobbs-Merrill, 1963
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Frank Harris begins on p. 319
The Mysteries of Oscar Wilde
Fisher, Trevor.
History Today, Vol. 50, No. 12, December 2000
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