Gettysburg Address

Gettysburg Address: Selected full-text books and articles

The Gettysburg Address: Perspectives on Lincoln's Greatest Speech By Harold Holzer; Sean Conant Oxford University Press, 2015
FREE! Lincoln's Gettysburg Address By Orton H. Carmichael Abingdon Press, 1917
Librarian's tip: The text of the speech begins on p. 71
Reflections on Language By Stuart Hirschberg; Terry Hirschberg Oxford University Press, 1999
My Fellow Americans: Presidential Addresses That Shaped History By James C. Humes Praeger, 1992
Librarian's tip: Chap. 6 "The Gettysburg Address: The Great American Poem"
Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend By Lois J. Einhorn Greenwood Press, 1992
Librarian's tip: The text of the speech begins on p. 177; analysis is in Chap. 6 "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address: Immediate Failure and Lasting Success"
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Gettysburg Address: A Sacred, but Elusive Text Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 18, 2013
U.S. Presidents as Orators: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook By Halford Ryan Greenwood Press, 1995
Librarian's tip: "Abraham Lincoln" begins on p. 77
Lincoln Legends: Myths, Hoaxes, and Confabulations Associated with Our Greatest President By Edward Steers Jr University Press of Kentucky, 2007
Librarian's tip: Chap. 9 "The 'Lost' Draft of the Gettysburg Address"
Real or Fake: Studies in Authentication By Joe Nickell University Press of Kentucky, 2009
Librarian's tip: Chap. 4 "Lincoln's Lost Gettysburg Address"
Virginia at War, 1863 By William C. Davis; James I. Robertson Jr University Press of Kentucky, 2009
Librarian's tip: “'Lincoln Acted the Clown'" Virginia’s Newspapers and the Gettysburg Address" begins on p. 115
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Arranging Grief: Sacred Time and the Body in Nineteenth-Century America By Dana Luciano New York University Press, 2007
Librarian's tip: Discussion of the Gettysburg Address begins on p. 223
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