Alternative Medicine

alternative medicine, the treatment and prevention of disease by techniques that are regarded by modern Western medicine as scientifically unproven or unorthodox. The term alternative medicine can encompass a wide range of therapies, including chiropractic, homeopathy, naturopathy, acupuncture, herbal medicine, meditation, biofeedback, massage therapy, and various "new age" therapies such as guided imagery and naturopathy. Although many alternative therapies have long been widely employed in the treatment of disease, the scientifically oriented modern medical establishment has typically been skeptical about, and sometimes strongly opposed to, their use. Despite this, Americans spend billions of dollars on alternative treatments each year. In 1993 the U.S. National Institutes of Health established the Office of Alternative Medicine to examine the merits of such techniques. See also holistic medicine.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Alternative Medicine: Selected full-text books and articles

Nature Cures: The History of Alternative Medicine in America
James C. Whorton.
Oxford University Press, 2004
The Politics of Healing: Histories of Alternative Medicine in Twentieth-Century North America
Robert D. Johnston.
Routledge, 2004
Alternative Medicine: More Hype Than Hope?
Rosch, Paul J.
The Exceptional Parent, Vol. 43, No. 8, August 2013
Toward a Meaningful Alternative Medicine
Prasad, Vinay.
The Hastings Center Report, Vol. 39, No. 5, September-October 2009
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Complementary and Alternative Therapies: An Evidence-Based Framework
Shaw, Steven R.
National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, Vol. 37, No. 3, November 2008
Who Benefits from Alternative Therapy?
Weber, Christopher.
Colorlines Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 3, Fall 2003
Mosby's Complementary Alternative Medicine: A Research-Based Approach
Lyn W. Freeman; G. Frank Lawlis.
Mosby, 2001
The Mainstreaming of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Studies in Social Context
Philip Tovey; Gary Easthope:Jon Adams.
Routledge, 2003
An Ethical Framework for Complementary and Alternative Therapists
Julie Stone.
Routledge, 2002
Explaining the Growth of Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Coulter, Ian; Willis, Evan.
Health Sociology Review, Vol. 16, No. 3/4, October 2007
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Understanding the Placebo Effect in Complementary Medicine: Theory, Practice, and Research
David Peters.
Churchill Livingstone, 2001
Time for Healing: Integrating Traditional Therapies with Scientific Medical Practice
Carl Becker.
Paragon House, 2002
Holism and Complementary Medicine: Origins and Principles
Vincent Di Stefano.
Allen & Unwin, 2006
Classical Homeopathy
Marc S. Micozzi; Michael Carlston.
Churchill Livingstone, 2003
African American Alternative Medicine: Using Alternative Medicine to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases
Eric J. Bailey.
Bergin & Garvey, 2002
Healing Powers and Modernity: Traditional Medicine, Shamanism, and Science in Asian Societies
Linda H. Connor; Geoffrey Samuel.
Bergin and Garvey, 2001
Learning from China: Researchers Are Finding That Traditional Chinese Medicine May Have a Lot to Offer
Underwood, Anne.
Newsweek, December 2, 2002
Healing at the Borderland of Medicine and Religion
Michael H. Cohen; Allan M. Brandt; Larry R. Churchill.
University of North Carolina Press, 2006
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