Textile Industry

textiles

textiles, all fabrics made by weaving, felting, knitting, braiding, or netting, from the various textile fibers (see fiber).

Types of Textiles

Textiles are classified according to their component fibers into silk, wool, linen, cotton, such synthetic fibers as rayon, nylon, and polyesters, and some inorganic fibers, such as cloth of gold, glass fiber, and asbestos cloth. They are also classified as to their structure or weave, according to the manner in which warp and weft cross each other in the loom (see loom; weaving). Value or quality in textiles depends on several factors, such as the quality of the raw material used and the character of the yarn spun from the fibers, whether clean, smooth, fine, or coarse and whether hard, soft, or medium twisted. Density of weave and finishing processes are also important elements in determining the quality of fabrics.

Tapestry, sometimes classed as embroidery, is a modified form of plain cloth weaving. The weaving of carpet and rugs is a special branch of the textile industry. Other specially prepared fabrics not woven are felt and bark (or tapa) cloth, which are beaten or matted together, and a few in which a single thread is looped or plaited, as in crochet and netting work and various laces. Most textiles are now produced in factories, with highly specialized power looms, but many of the finest velvets, brocades, and table linens are still made by hand.

The Printing of Textiles

Textile printing, the various processes by which fabrics are printed in colored design, is an ancient art. Although the time and place of origin are uncertain, examples of Greek fabrics from the 4th cent. BC have been found. India exported block prints to the Mediterranean region in the 5th cent. BC, and Indian chintz was imported into Europe during the Renaissance and widely imitated. France became a leading center and was noted especially for the toile de Jouy manufactured at Jouy from 1760 to 1811.

Early forms of textile printing are stencil work, highly developed by Japanese artists, and block printing. In the latter method a block of wood, copper, or other material bearing a design in intaglio with the dye paste applied to the surface is pressed on the fabric and struck with a mallet. A separate block is used for each color, and pitch pins at the corners guide the placing of the blocks to assure accurate repeating of the pattern. In cylinder or roller printing, developed c.1785, the fabric is carried on a rotating central cylinder and pressed by a series of rollers each bearing one color. The design is engraved on the copper rollers by hand or machine pressure or etched by pantograph or photoengraving methods; the color paste is applied to the rollers through feed rollers rotating in a color box, the color being scraped off the smooth portion of the rollers with knives.

More recent printing processes include screen printing, a hand method especially suitable for large patterns with soft outlines, in which screens, one for each color, are placed on the fabric and the color paste pressed through by a wooden squeegee; spray printing, in which a spray gun forces the color through a screen; and electrocoating, used to apply a patterned pile. Color may be applied by the various processes directly; by the discharge method, which uses chemicals to destroy a portion of a previously dyed ground; or by the resist, or reserve, method, which prevents the development of a subsequently applied color to a portion of the fabric treated with a chemical or with a mechanical resist.

History

Yarn, fabrics, and tools for spinning and weaving have been found among the earliest relics of human habitations. Linen fabrics dating from 5000 BC have been discovered in Egypt. Woolen textiles from the early Bronze Age in Scandinavia and Switzerland have also been found. Cotton has been spun and woven in India since 3000 BC, and silk has been woven in China since at least 1000 BC About the 4th cent. AD, Constantinople began to weave the raw silk imported from China. A century later silk culture spread to the Western countries, and textile making developed rapidly. By the 14th cent. splendid fabrics were being woven on the hand looms of the Mediterranean countries in practically all the basic structures known to modern artisans, and there has been no change in fundamental processes since that time, although methods and equipment have been radically altered.

Bibliography

See A. T. C. Robinson, Woven Cloth Construction (1967); E. E. Stout, Introduction to Textiles, (3d ed. 1970); A. Geijer, A History of Textile Art (1982); F. M. Montgomery, Textiles in America, 1650 to 1870 (1984); M. Thomas, Textiles: History of an Art (1985); E. J. W. Barber, Prehistoric Textiles (1991).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Textile Industry: Selected full-text books and articles

The Textile Book
Colin Gale; Jasbir Kaur.
Berg, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 10 "Industry"
Legal Structure of International Textile Trade
Henry R. Zheng.
Quorum Books, 1988
Capital-Labor Relations in the U.S. Textile Industry
Barry E. Truchil.
Praeger Publishers, 1988
U.S. Textile Industry Unraveling
Sparshott, Jeffrey.
The World and I, Vol. 20, No. 2, February 2005
The General Textile Strike of 1934: From Maine to Alabama
John A. Salmond.
University of Missouri Press, 2002
Making Sweatshops: The Globalization of the U.S. Apparel Industry
Ellen Israel Rosen.
University of California Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 3 "Roots of Postwar Textile and Apparel Trade: The Reconstruction of the Asian-Pacific Rim Textile Industry" and Chap. 5 "The U.S. Textile Industry: Responses to Free Trade"
Women, Work, and the Japanese Economic Miracle: The Case of the Cotton Textile Industry, 1945-1975
Helen Macnaughtan.
RoutledgeCurzon, 2004
Women and the Labour Market in Japan's Industrialising Economy: The Textile Industry before the Pacific War
Janet Hunter.
Routledge Curzon, 2003
Market and Society in Korea: Interest, Institution, and the Textile Industry
Dennis McNamara.
Routledge, 2002
Manufacturing Strategies of Network-Based Small Firms: Observations on the Textile Industry in Taiwan
Chen, Wen-Hsien.
Journal of Small Business Management, Vol. 37, No. 2, April 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Restructuring or De-Industrializing? Zimbabwe's Textile and Metal Industries under Adjustment
Lloyd M. Sachikonye.
Nordic African Institute, 1999
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