Irving Fisher

Irving Fisher, 1867–1947, American economist, b. Saugerties, N.Y., Ph.D. Yale, 1891. He began teaching at Yale in 1890 and was active there until 1935. His earliest work was in mathematics, and he made a distinguished contribution to mathematical economic theory. He was noted chiefly for his studies in managed currency, in which he set forth the theory of the "compensated dollar" whereby purchasing power might be stabilized. His expansion of interest theory included the theory of investment appraisal, which relied on a person's willingness to sacrifice present for future income. He was also one of the first to work out a numbered index system for filing. Fisher's interests were wide; they included activities in academic, business, welfare, and public organizations, especially public health societies. Important among his many books are Mathematical Investigations in the Theory of Value and Prices (1892), Appreciation and Interest (1896), The Nature of Capital and Income (1906), The Rate of Interest (1907), The Making of Index Numbers (1922), and Theory of Interest (1930).

See biography by his son, I. N. Fisher (1956).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Irving Fisher: Selected full-text books and articles

The "Noble Experiment"
Irving Fisher; H. Bruce Brougham.
Alcohol Information Committee, 1930
Prohibition at Its Worst
Irving Fisher.
Macmillan, 1926
Prohibition at Its Worst
Irving Fisher.
Macmillan, 1926
America's Interest in World Peace
Irving Fisher.
Funk & Wagnalls Co., 1924
League or War?
Irving Fisher.
Harper & Brothers, 1923
The Stabilization of Business
Wesley C. Mitchell; Irving Fisher; Frank Haigh Dixon; John R. Commons; Lionel D. Edie; Edwin R. A. Seligman; John B. Andrews; Walter Dill Scott; Henry S. Dennison; Lionel D. Edie.
Macmillan, 1923
Librarian’s tip: "Chap. II: "Stabilizing the Dollar" by Irving Fisher
The Economic Mind in America: Essays in the History of American Economics
Malcolm Rutherford.
Routledge, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 5 "Irving Fisher as a Policy Advocate" and Chap. 9 "The Quest for an Ideal Index: Irving Fisher and the Making of Index Numbers"
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