Civil Rights Movement (Primary Sources)

These works are personal accounts, speeches, writings, and other documents relating to the civil rights movement in the United States. They are primary sources.

Civil Rights Movement (Primary Sources): Selected full-text books and articles

Let Freedom Ring: A Documentary History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement By Peter B. Levy Praeger, 1992
Librarian's tip: Includes many important documents of the civil rights movement, including speeches, personal recollections, and legal documents. Includes Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" and "Letter from Birmingham Jail."
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Daybreak of Freedom: The Montgomery Bus Boycott By Stewart Burns University of North Carolina Press, 1997
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
In Peace and Freedom: My Journey in Selma By Bernard Lafayette Jr.; Kathryn Lee Johnson University Press of Kentucky, 2013
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
In Search of Democracy: The NAACP Writings of James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and Roy Wilkins (1920-1977) By Sondra Kathryn Wilson Oxford University Press, 1999
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Autobiography of W. E. B. Du Bois: A Soliloquy on Viewing My Life from the Last Decade of Its First Century By W. E. B. Du Bois International Publishers, 1968
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Civil Rights Childhood By Jordana Y. Shakoor University Press of Mississippi, 1999
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Climbin' Jacob's Ladder: The Black Freedom Movement Writings of Jack O'Dell By Jack O'Dell; Nikhil Pal Singh University of California Press, 2010
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Outside the Magic Circle: The Autobiography of Virginia Foster Durr By Virginia Foster Durr; Hollinger F. Barnard University of Alabama Press, 1990
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Hearts and Minds: A Personal Chronicle of Race in America By Harry S. Ashmore Seven Locks Press, 1988 (Revised edition)
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Civil Rights Chronicle: Letters from the South By Clarice T. Campbell University Press of Mississippi, 1997
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Selma, Lord, Selma: Girlhood Memories of the Civil-Rights Days By Frank Sikora; Rachel West Nelson; Sheyann Webb University of Alabama Press, 1997
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Silent Gesture: Autobiography of Tommie Smith By David Steele; Tommie Smith Temple University Press, 2007
Librarian's tip: Tommie Smith is one of two athletes who gave the Black Power salute while on the medal platform at the 1968 Olympics.
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Man Who Cried Genocide: An Autobiography By William L. Patterson International Publishers, 1991
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Civil Rights By Marcus D. Pohlmann; Linda Vallar Whisenhunt Greenwood Press, 2002
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Freedom on the Border: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky By Catherine Fosl; Tracy E. K’Meyer University Press of Kentucky, 2009
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Let My People Go: Cairo, Illinois, 1967-1973 : Civil Rights Photographs By Jan Peterson Roddy; Preston Ewing Jr Southern Illinois University Press, 1996
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People By Civil Rights Congress International Publishers, 1970
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Freedom to the Free: Century of Emancipation, 1863-1963: A Report to the President By United States Commission On Civil Rights U.S. Government Printing Office, 1963
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Memoir of a Race Traitor By Mab Segrest South End Press, 1994
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Freedom Writer: Virginia Foster Durr, Letters from the Civil Rights Years By Virginia Foster Durr; Patricia Sullivan Routledge, 2003
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Last Days: A Son's Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South By Charles Marsh Basic Books, 2001
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Rhetoric of Black Revolution By Arthur L. Smith Allyn and Bacon, 1969
Librarian's tip: Includes the texts of speeches by Frederick Douglass, Adam Clayton Powell, Franklin Florence, Eldridge Cleaver, and Bobby Seale.
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Blood & Bone: Truth and Reconciliation in a Southern Town By Jack Shuler University of South Carolina Press, 2012
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Round: The Pursuit of Racial Justice in the Rural South By Richard A. Couto Temple University Press, 1991
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
The Third Door: The Autobiography of an American Negro Woman By Ellen Tarry University of Alabama Press, 1992
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
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