Louis Farrakhan

Louis Farrakhan (fâr´əkăn´, fär´əkän´), 1933–, African-American religious leader, b. New York City, as Louis Eugene Walcott. A former calypso singer known as "The Charmer," he joined the Nation of Islam (Black Muslims) in 1955, eventually becoming minister of the Harlem Temple after Malcolm X broke with the religious group. After Elijah Muhammad died and his son steered the Black Muslims toward Sunni Islamic practice, Farrakhan founded (1977) a reorganized Nation of Islam that adhered to the elder Muhammad's teachings. Often denounced as anti-Semitic and antiwhite, Farrakhan has stridently criticized white Americans while emphasizing African-American self-improvement. In 1995 he was one of the chief organizers of the Million Man March, a day of renewal for African-American men in Washington, D.C. In 2000, Farrakhan publicly reconciled with W. Deen Mohammed, Elijah's son. In 2006, Farrakhan, suffering from illness, gave the day-to-day responsibilities for running the Nation of Islam to its executive board.

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2015, The Columbia University Press.

Louis Farrakhan: Selected full-text books and articles

The Muslim Community in North America By Earle H. Waugh; Baha Abu-Laban; Regula B. Qureshi University of Alberta Press, 1983
Librarian’s tip: "Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Final Call: Schism in the Muslim Movement" begins on p. 234
Black Leadership By Manning Marable Columbia University Press, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 11 "Black Fundamentalism: Louis Farrakhan and the Politics of Conservative Black Nationalism"
Ministry of Lies: The Truth behind the Nation of Islam's "The Secret Relationship between Blacks and Jews" By Harold Brackman Four Walls Eight Windows, 1994
Librarian’s tip: Includes discussion of Louis Farrakhan in multiple chapters
Leaders from the 1960s: A Biographical Sourcebook of American Activism By David DeLeon Greenwood Press, 1994
Librarian’s tip: "Louis Abdul Farrakhan (1933-) Minister of the Nation of Islam" begins on p. 89
Islam in America By Jane I. Smith Columbia University Press, 1999
Librarian’s tip: "Louis Farrakhan" begins on p. 93
Speaking Truth to Power: Essays on Race, Resistance, and Radicalism By Manning Marable Westview Press, 1996
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 13 "Louis Farrakhan and the Million Man March, 1995"
Black Political Organizations in the Post-Civil Rights Era By Ollie A. Johnson Iii; Karlin L. Stanford Rutgers University Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Six "'You're Not Ready for Farrakhan': The Nation of Islam and the Struggle for Black Political Leadership, 1984-2000"
The Last Angry Man By Coates, Ta-Nehisi The Washington Monthly, January 2001
Weapons of Mass Insurrection. (Cover Story: The Home Front) By Grigg, William Norman The New American, Vol. 18, No. 24, December 2, 2002
Race Rules: Navigating the Color Line By Michael Eric Dyson Addison-Wesley, 1996
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Louis Farrakhan begins on p. 163
Black Liberation in Conservative America By Manning Marable South End Press, 1997
Librarian’s tip: "Should Farrakhan Be Allowed to Speak?" begins on p. 233
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