Broadway, famous thoroughfare in New York City. It extends from Bowling Green near the foot of Manhattan island N to 262d St. in the Bronx. Throughout its length Broadway is chiefly a commercial street. In lower Manhattan it runs through the financial center of the country; N of Union Square (14th St.) it passes a merchandising section; further N around Herald Square there are large department stores; finally around Times Square (42d St.), which has undergone significant redevelopment, it enters the theater district, or the "Great White Way," the most storied portion of Broadway. Points of interest along Broadway include Trinity Church (Wall St.); St. Paul's Chapel, built 1766 (near City Hall); the Woolworth Building (at Barclay St.); the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts (64th–66th streets); Columbia Univ. (113th–121st streets); the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (168th St.); and Van Cortlandt Park (at the north end of the city). Broadway was laid out by the Dutch and was the principal street of New Amsterdam; its northern stretches in Manhattan were formerly called Bloomingdale Road.

See D. W. Dunlap, On Broadway (1990).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2015, The Columbia University Press.

Broadway: Selected full-text books and articles

On Broadway: Art and Commerce on the Great White Way By Steven Adler Southern Illinois University Press, 2004
Blue-Collar Broadway: The Craft and Industry of American Theater By Timothy R. White University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015
Broadway Scrapbook By Brooks Atkinson Theatre Arts, 1947
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