Frances Perkins

Frances Perkins, 1882–1965, U.S. Secretary of Labor (1933–45), b. Boston. She worked at Hull House, was executive secretary of the New York Consumers' League (1910–12) and of the New York Committee on Safety (1912–17), and directed (1912–13) investigations for the New York state factory commission. She became an authority on industrial hazards and hygiene and began lobbying in Albany for more comprehensive factory laws and for maximum-hour laws for women. Gov. Alfred E. Smith appointed (1923) her to the New York State Industrial Board, and later she served (1926–29) as its chairman. Gov. Franklin Delano Roosevelt named her (1929) industrial commissioner of New York state to direct the enforcement of factory and labor laws. As President, Roosevelt appointed her U.S. Secretary of Labor—the first appointment of a woman to the U.S. cabinet. Her appointment was bitterly criticized by business, labor, and political leaders. As Secretary of Labor, she promoted adoption of the Social Security Act, advocated higher wages, urged legislation to alleviate industrial strife, and helped standardize state industrial legislation. After she resigned, she served (1946–52) as a member of the U.S. Civil Service Commission. Besides books on labor problems, she wrote The Roosevelt I Knew (1946).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2018, The Columbia University Press.

Frances Perkins: Selected full-text books and articles

Frances Perkins: Champion of the New Deal By Naomi Pasachoff Oxford University Press, 1999
Frances Perkins and the German-Jewish Refugees, 1933-1940 By Zucker, Bat-Ami American Jewish History, Vol. 89, No. 1, March 2001
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
No Kitchen Cabinet This: Frances Perkins Becomes Secretary of Labor By Rulli, Daniel F Teaching History: A Journal of Methods, Vol. 33, No. 2, Fall 2008
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Soon or Later On: Franklin D. Roosevelt and National Health Insurance, 1933-1945 By Kooijman, Jaap Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 29, No. 2, June 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The American Reader, from Columbus to Today: By Paul M. Angle Rand McNally, 1958
PRIMARY SOURCE
A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic. Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical documents, original philosophical writings, and religious texts.
Social Security: Separating Fact from Fiction By Allen, Frederick The Saturday Evening Post, Vol. 284, No. 1, January-February 2012
Encyclopedia of Women in American Politics By Helen Thomas; Jeffrey D. Schultz; Laura Van Assendelft Oryx, 1999
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.