Academic journal article The Technology Teacher

Technology Education Teacher Demand, 2002-2005: It Is Clear That There Is a Shortage of Teachers, Especially Technology Education Teaches

Academic journal article The Technology Teacher

Technology Education Teacher Demand, 2002-2005: It Is Clear That There Is a Shortage of Teachers, Especially Technology Education Teaches

Article excerpt

The technology education teaching profession is concerned about teacher supply and demand. In 1997, the International Technology Education Association (ITEA) published a study projecting the shortage of technology education teachers (Weston, 1997). Weston's data projected technology education teacher needs through 2001. This is a follow-up of that study, which is continuing to be monitored by Old Dominion University.

Nationally, publications continue to report the need for teachers. Although the data varies, a report by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) has estimated that the U.S. will need between 1.7 and 2.7 million teachers by 2008. Even with the number disparity, they predict that 66 percent of U.S. teachers are expected to retire or stop teaching in the next decade (CNN.com-Reuters, 2002). Many of these departures are attributed to teacher dissatisfaction, "As many as 33% of new hires leave teaching altogether in their first three years, and 46% leave in the first five years" (Ingersoll, 2002).

The 2000 Educator Supply and Demand in the United States, developed by the American Association for Employment in Education, reports that the national need for technology education teachers was 4.17 on a five point scale, indicating some shortages. Figures reported between 5.00 and 4.21 indicated considerable shortages. Regions with considerable shortages of technology education teachers were the Great Plains/Midwest (4.44; Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota), Southeast (4.31; Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia), Mid-Atlantic (4.54; Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania), and the Northeast (4.29; Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont). The need for technology education teachers increased on a five point scale by .14 from 1999 to 2000 (AAEE, 2001). This study is available online at www.aaee.org. Also an additional study by Alexander, Allen, and Nelson (1998) revealed that a serious shortage of technology education teachers exists in the U.S.

Methods of Data Collection

An instrument modeled after that of Weston's (1997), was sent to the lead technology education specialist (supervisor, director, etc.) for each of the 50 states. Additional questions were developed to find if technology education curricula were beginning to be changed and be based on Standards for Technological Literacy. Questions were also asked to determine how states were coping with the shortage of technology education teachers.

Forty surveys (80%) were initially completed and returned. Follow-up telephone calls were made to the ten non-respondents or their designees. All surveys were returned for a 100% response rate.

Findings

Teacher Supply

There were 16,774 middle school technology teachers and 19,487 high school technology teachers for a total of 36,261 technology education teachers employed during the 2001 school year in the U.S. Table 1 shows the number of technology education teachers employed in the U.S. by state, as of fall 2001. In the 1997 Weston study, it was estimated that 37,968 technology education teachers were employed. One state did not respond to the 1997 study. Two states did not know how many technology education teachers they employed when responding to the 2002 study. Overall, this study showed that there are 1707 fewer technology education teachers employed in the U.S. between 1997 and 2001.

Teacher Demand

Table 1 also displays the projections for additional middle and high school technology education teachers needed for 2001 (2337 estimate), 2003 (3033 estimate), and 2005 (3648 estimate). A review of the 2001-2002 Industrial Teacher Education Directory (Bell, 2002) shows that 71 U.S. universities produced 672 technology education teachers in 2001. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.