Academic journal article Federal Communications Law Journal

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Federal Communications Law Journal

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

Welcome to the second issue of Volume 55 of the Federal Communications Law Journal. This issue presents a diversity of topics that we hope educates and opens the door for debate among our readership.

In our first Article, Robert Cannon reviews the history of the FCC's Computer Inquiries, and how they have repeatedly reexamined and redefined the nature of the regulatory treatment of computer networks over communications networks. In the second Article, Rob Frieden assesses the viability of different vertical regulatory regimes in an increasingly convergent environment, concluding that a horizontal regulatory structure is a more intelligent model for a convergent, and increasingly Internet-dominated, marketplace. Our third Article, by William Malone, responds to Christopher Day's "The Concrete Barrier at the End of the Information Superhighway: Why Lack of Local Rights-of-Way Access Is Killing Competitive Local Exchange," published in last year's Journal. Malone argues that Day's article lacks persuasive evidence that CLECs are harmed by lack of rights-of-way access.

Issue Two also features three student-written notes. The first, by Anastasia Bednarski, discusses the regulation of the radio industry after the 1996 Telecommunications Act, showing an excessive adherence to the marketplace model. Next, Jacob T. Rigney explores broadcast indecency and obscenity laws, focusing his analysis on the FCC's 2001 Industry Guidance Report on the Commission's case law interpreting 18 U.S.C. [section] 1464 and the enforcement policies regarding broadcast indecency. This Note contains explicit language and harsh descriptive language necessary to illustrate the Author's argument. Our final Note by Matthew Parker Voors tackles the balance between encryption regulation and national security in a post-9/11 world. …

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