Academic journal article Global Virtue Ethics Review

Editorial Observations

Academic journal article Global Virtue Ethics Review

Editorial Observations

Article excerpt

This issue of GVER consists of three articles and one book review. The issue begins with Jack Kem addressing the public policy issue of the appropriateness of the federal government supporting faith based initiatives. Next, the issue turns to Jonathan Anderson's satire that helps us appreciate the relationship of doing the public's business and the important subject of the meaning of life. The final article for the issue is written by Stephen L. Esquith, who addresses the ethical subject of corporate reparations for such past acts as slavery and genocide. The issue ends with Saundra J. Reinke presenting a movie review of The Fellowship of the Ring, which she notes stresses the role of virtue ethics in human decision-making.

Jack Kem, from the Department of Public Administration, North Carolina State University, wrote "Weighed and Found Wanting: Finding the Proper Balance Between Faith-Based Organizations and Government." In particular, he addressed President Bush's new Faith-Based Initiative. He notes that views vary on this topic. Some see the need for partnering with faith-based organizations as a natural use of existing stable organizations to provide much-needed social programs throughout the country. In contrast, others see this initiative as a dangerous precedent that crosses a distinct line between church and state. He explores the important ethics related to this public policy subject. He sheds light on the subject by examining the life of Daniel mentioned in the Jewish Bible and thus notes the danger of this new policy.

Jonathan Anderson, from the Department of Public Administration, University of Alaska Southeast, wrote "A Modest Proposal on 'The Meaning of Life'", which is a satire building on the work of Jonathan Swift. He posits that Public Administration facilitates "The Meaning of Life." His first section locates personal "meaning" in individual empowerment and concludes that this empowerment is best achieved through a democratic system of collective action. …

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